Captain Charles

Newbie needs advice please

43 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, FlyingMonkey said:

My 2007 does have an extra spring compared to yours.  But I think "light" is relative.  I have never seen a CT with stick forces near as light as a Tecnam or RV-12.

My CT has lighter forces than anything else I have ever flow.  The demo CT I flew felt the same.  I generally don't even hold the stick but instead push against it with a single finger tip.  

My forces are lighter than the RV-6 I've flown. I've never flown a 12.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My CTLS stick forces seem quite high to me, compared to the Evektor Sportstar that I trained on. However I have written it off to the effect of the autopilot servos riding on the control lines in the CT, which the Evektor did not have. Like a lot of guys stepping down from heavier planes, I believe you will find the CT a challenge to land. It has a glider heritage and can float along on almost nothing.

The rental Evektor I trained on also was famous for landing incidents with airline pilots at the controls. To be fair, many were caused after (or during) landing due to a too effective nose wheel steering issue which made the plane squirrely on the ground. It's all in what you are used to.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - I will bite...

I have owned an flown a CTSW, CTLS and CTLSi.   I have flown the SportCruiser and the RV-12.   Each of these planes has its pros and cons.  Since I have bought 3 CT's, I guess that makes me a CT guy.

CTSW - Excellent Useful Load - What an amazing feat to have 600 pounds of useful load.   I never really noticed all that much difference between the handling characteristics of the CTSW versus CTLS.  That extra 14" of boom length may help but I just can't say that was a big deal to me.   In any CT, you become a good stick and rudder pilot.

CTLS - Useful load declining.  The reason I like the CTLS over the CTSW is mainly the improved landing gear.  The weak link in my opinion on the CTSW is the springy and relatively light landing gear.   Its not a deal killer, useful load should guide the decision but if you really don't need that 600 pounds of useful load, I'd probably go CTLS just to have landing gear that is a little more robust and forgiving.

CTLSi - Useful load all but gone.  The CTLSi I own weighs in around 850.  Nice airplane, lots of toys to play with but they all weigh a lot.   Since my mission is short hops, fair weather burger chasing I get by with the lower useful load.   If I were to be a long distance hauler with 2 adult males or a heavier female, I would want the useful load of a CTLS or CTSW.

In my opinion - which one is all about useful load.

Another thought - I think no matter what you buy I'd go for Tundra Gear (larger rear tires).  They add just a little more flexibility to landings.

As for flying a CT (any of them) the biggest thing to master is learning how to land one.  I don't care how many hours you have in fighter jets, SR22's, Mooney's or Cessna's - learning to land a CT is where you should focus some quality time with a competent CFI  (many right here, Eric in AZ since you mentioned AZ).   You need to spend quality time doing some dual transition training focused mostly on landings.  You should then do a couple hundred landings solo and continue to log landings by the dozens every chance you get.  There are more arguments here on this forum about landing technique than any other topic.   If the CT has any finicky attitudes - they all center on landing!  

Why not SportCruiser? RV12?   If you land off airport given the very light weight landing gear on any of these you'll most likely flip over.   Can't open a bubble canopy when its upside down.  In an RV12 you'll be drenched in gasoline and roast like a fine tom turkey.  In a sportcruiser you'll just be trapped since the fuel is on the wings, maybe you don't roast as much or as quickly.  That CT has a very strong occupant cell.  Flip upside down in one and you'll just undo the door latch and climb out.

On speed, I typically only see about 105 but I'm usually not at as high an altitude on my short burger hops.  The CT likes to fly fast.  It takes an act of congress and a dive to get a Sportcruiser over 100.  120?  Not too many LSA's can do that...  If Ed is getting 127 - he is doing great!  In a CT, you need to SLOW IT DOWN in the pattern (it likes to keep going 100+!)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FlyingMonkey said:

Adam, that was a great post, I think all your comments are spot on.  

 

Thanks!  Not sure if its wisdom or dribble but its based on my 9 years flying all 3 models of CT :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Adam said:

Thanks!  Not sure if its wisdom or dribble but its based on my 9 years flying all 3 models of CT :-)

 

10 hours ago, Adam said:

OK - I will bite...

I have owned an flown a CTSW, CTLS and CTLSi.   I have flown the SportCruiser and the RV-12.   Each of these planes has its pros and cons.  Since I have bought 3 CT's, I guess that makes me a CT guy.

CTSW - Excellent Useful Load - What an amazing feat to have 600 pounds of useful load.   I never really noticed all that much difference between the handling characteristics of the CTSW versus CTLS.  That extra 14" of boom length may help but I just can't say that was a big deal to me.   In any CT, you become a good stick and rudder pilot.

CTLS - Useful load declining.  The reason I like the CTLS over the CTSW is mainly the improved landing gear.  The weak link in my opinion on the CTSW is the springy and relatively light landing gear.   Its not a deal killer, useful load should guide the decision but if you really don't need that 600 pounds of useful load, I'd probably go CTLS just to have landing gear that is a little more robust and forgiving.

CTLSi - Useful load all but gone.  The CTLSi I own weighs in around 850.  Nice airplane, lots of toys to play with but they all weigh a lot.   Since my mission is short hops, fair weather burger chasing I get by with the lower useful load.   If I were to be a long distance hauler with 2 adult males or a heavier female, I would want the useful load of a CTLS or CTSW.

In my opinion - which one is all about useful load.

Another thought - I think no matter what you buy I'd go for Tundra Gear (larger rear tires).  They add just a little more flexibility to landings.

As for flying a CT (any of them) the biggest thing to master is learning how to land one.  I don't care how many hours you have in fighter jets, SR22's, Mooney's or Cessna's - learning to land a CT is where you should focus some quality time with a competent CFI  (many right here, Eric in AZ since you mentioned AZ).   You need to spend quality time doing some dual transition training focused mostly on landings.  You should then do a couple hundred landings solo and continue to log landings by the dozens every chance you get.  There are more arguments here on this forum about landing technique than any other topic.   If the CT has any finicky attitudes - they all center on landing!  

Why not SportCruiser? RV12?   If you land off airport given the very light weight landing gear on any of these you'll most likely flip over.   Can't open a bubble canopy when its upside down.  In an RV12 you'll be drenched in gasoline and roast like a fine tom turkey.  In a sportcruiser you'll just be trapped since the fuel is on the wings, maybe you don't roast as much or as quickly.  That CT has a very strong occupant cell.  Flip upside down in one and you'll just undo the door latch and climb out.

On speed, I typically only see about 105 but I'm usually not at as high an altitude on my short burger hops.  The CT likes to fly fast.  It takes an act of congress and a dive to get a Sportcruiser over 100.  120?  Not too many LSA's can do that...  If Ed is getting 127 - he is doing great!  In a CT, you need to SLOW IT DOWN in the pattern (it likes to keep going 100+!)

Bottom line is payload then.

Well that isn't too much of an issue, so following your experience, and my own with other planes, I'll be looking for the later models.

Maybe a CTLSi , since the issue of carb balancing and fuel economy seems to be often quoted.

Thanks for the very informative post.

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go used.  Get the bird inspected by Roger (In AZ and highly visible here on the forum). Roger has been a CT owner for years and is an expert CT mechanic.  I once flew him to CA to work on my CTSW!

The big maint item at 5 years is the rotax rubber replacement.  If your bird is near or just past 5 years you either have an expense looming or you want to make sure it was done right!  (~$2000 to $2500).

make careful inspection of landing gear and attachment points inside baggage area.  Carbon Fiber fractures suddenly, not slowly.  If the plane has had hard landings more apt to have a gear collapse.  Look for any signs of stress cracking or fracture lines where gear attaches.

Thats my 2 cents on what to look for

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Adam said:

If you go used.  Get the bird inspected by Roger (In AZ and highly visible here on the forum). Roger has been a CT owner for years and is an expert CT mechanic.  I once flew him to CA to work on my CTSW!

The big maint item at 5 years is the rotax rubber replacement.  If your bird is near or just past 5 years you either have an expense looming or you want to make sure it was done right!  (~$2000 to $2500).

make careful inspection of landing gear and attachment points inside baggage area.  Carbon Fiber fractures suddenly, not slowly.  If the plane has had hard landings more apt to have a gear collapse.  Look for any signs of stress cracking or fracture lines where gear attaches.

Thats my 2 cents on what to look for

 

Thanks Adam,all advice very welcome.

Whats the Rotax rubber replacement ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every 5 years a Rotax 912 (ULS or iS) requires virtually all rubber hoses to be replaced.  This includes fuel lines, and water hoses.  Its an extensive job that will set you back ~$2,000 to ~$2500 parts and labor.  This is required on any LSA with a Rotax engine. (Its not a CT thing).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Adam said:

Every 5 years a Rotax 912 (ULS or iS) requires virtually all rubber hoses to be replaced.  This includes fuel lines, and water hoses.  Its an extensive job that will set you back ~$2,000 to ~$2500 parts and labor.  This is required on any LSA with a Rotax engine. (Its not a CT thing).

Thanks for the clarification.

Whats the breakdown in costs, parts v labor ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ls6pilot said:

Don't forget the approximately 2k chute repack and rocket at 12 years.

 

Is that for the chute repack AND rocket ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now