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John Lancaster

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About John Lancaster

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    Passenger Member

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  • Location
    Washington, DC
  • Interests
    aviation history, mountain flying, 1919 transcontinental air race
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. Hi John, thanks for your generous offer. Still working on my Chicago plans and will certainly keep KEKM in mind as a possible refueling or overnight stop. During the race in 1919 the pilots landed in Grant Park, which I gather is no longer an option. Thanks again!
  2. Thanks a lot Eric--exactly the kind of practical advice I was looking for. Will definitely keep it in mind.
  3. Hi Eric. Which route did you choose through the Rockies and Sierras? I'll be following the original route--Cheyenne to Rawlins to Green River in WY, then Salt Lake City to Salduro in Utah, Battle Mountain, NV to Reno, and finally Sacramento to SF. This roughly tracks the original transcontinental (Union Pacific) railroad and I-80. Looks like the highest terrain--approaching 12k--is in the Sierras. See route map below.
  4. Hi all. Next month I'll be leaving on a flight from Long Island to California in my 2015 CTLSi (N288CT). The flight is part of my research for a book on the 1919 transcontinental air race that will be published (eventually) by Liveright/W.W. Norton. I'll follow the original route, which roughly tracks the Union Pacific railroad and I-80 and thus crosses some pretty high mountains. If you're a fan of aviation history, please check out my website (www.1919airrace.com), which tells you a lot more about the project. Plane will be equipped with multiple cams. You can follow my journey on YouTube (@johnlancasterauthor), Facebook (@johnlancasterauthor), and Instagram when I get around to setting it up. In the meantime, I'd love to hear from any of you who have completed a similar crossing in a light sport, especially through the western states. How did it go and do you have any special advice? Thanks!
  5. Hi all. Next month I'll be leaving on a flight from Long Island to California in my 2015 CTLSi (N288CT). The flight is part of my research for a book on the 1919 transcontinental air race that will be published (eventually) by Liveright/W.W. Norton. I'll follow the original route, which roughly tracks the Union Pacific railroad and I-80 and thus crosses some pretty high mountains. If you're a fan of aviation history, please check out my website (www.1919airrace.com), which tells you a lot more about the project. Plane will be equipped with multiple cams. You can follow my journey on YouTube (@johnlancasterauthor), Facebook (@johnlancasterauthor), and Instagram when I get around to setting it up. In the meantime, I'd love to hear from any of you who have completed a similar crossing in a light sport, especially through the western states. How did it go and do you have any special advice? Thanks!
  6. Hi all, I recently have started to fuel my CTLSi with mogas. Based on advice from this forum, I purchased a Mr. Funnel to filter water and debris, and used it successfully the other day to transfer gas from a five-gallon plastic container. I placed the funnel in the fuel port on top of the wing, then stood on a ladder and held the can as I siphoned the gas into the funnel with an electric pump. I subsequently read that flowing fuel can build up a static charge and cause an explosion. Having lived to tell the tale, I'm wondering what, if anything, I should be doing differently. Or does the funnel ground any static charge by virtue of being in contact with the fuel port? I've also read that metal cans are safer than plastic for some reason. Thanks in advance for any guidance.
  7. I would like to start using 91+ auto gas in my CTLSi, for all the obvious reasons. Mechanic at my field said it's no problem, even with ethanol, as long as it doesn't sit in the tanks too long. He then suggested that I filter the gas with chamois cloth before using it. I tried this yesterday--lined a funnel with chamois and poured from one jerrycan into another. The problem is it took forever--the gas flows at such a trickle that it would have taken me an hour, literally, just to fill a single five-gallon can. Obviously not a viable solution. My questions: 1. Is it really necessary to filter auto gas? 2. If so, is there a better way to do it? Thanks for any advice.
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