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Jim Meade

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About Jim Meade

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    Iowa
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  1. Is there any way to modify the sight tube such that one no longer has to pull the wings? Different design or fitting? I've never like that sight tube, anyway, so maybe I'm just whining.
  2. Leading Edge Air Foils is one. The new and old filters are different, as you know. The new ones have fewer flats than the old ones. Their catalog number is N1205 and it costs a little over $27.
  3. I've also put all the new bare wires in a bundle and pulled the bundle. Agreed that tie-wrapping all is a pain. I ran a snake up from the rear and pulled everything toward the back. Yes, securing them in the tunnel is still a nuisance.
  4. Pad your head or pad the spar box. We may assume a helmet provides better protection but it would be interesting to see the discussion of padding the cabin rather than wearing a helmet. My absolutely subjective opinion is the helmet may protect better, but I actually have no expertise at all in this area and maybe a "padded dash" would be adequate. We all remember when car dashboards were not only bare steel but also pointy. Now they're padded, have air bags and we have good seat belts. I don't disagree at all that the spar box is pretty close to my (dense) skull. I'm only saying it is always worthwhile to look at both sides of the equation.
  5. Picked mine up today for the price above. 19 Jan 21. I understand the price increased the first of the year.
  6. I had my Teflon fuel lines made by Desser but others make them as well. One wants to be very careful on the measurement and how the fittings are clocked. Also, some hoses need an adapter to go from AN to metric. As Roger says, they are expensive. Each of us makes his own call on the value.
  7. Experimental aircraft are supposed to announce their status when they initiate a talk with ATC. I try to remember to do that but am not perfect. My preferred procedure is to say, "Cedar Rapids Tower, Flight Design 319CT Experimental with Romeo landing Cedar Rapids" or something like that. One often hears home builders announce, "Experimental 12345 landing Ottumwa". No clue as to the type of aircraft or it's operating characteristics. At my home field we have "experimental" aircraft that include gliders, Vans RV, FD, Pitts, Beech Bonanza, L29s, an M1 and lord knows what all else. If the L29, a Czech jet trainer, and the glider both got on the air and said "experimental" the casual listener would have no clue of the vastly different and important flight characteristics. I lead with FD rather than experimental because if one knows or looks up the FDCT designator one knows the operating characteristics. One could say that a homebuilt Vans RV is correctly called a Smith or a Jones or something, not a Vans RV, but the fact is they all fly like a Vans RV so it makes sense to call them that and toss in the experimental to make the ATC people happy. As a matter of fact, the L29s announce as L29, the M1 calls itself a helicopter, the glider is a glider, the Beech is a Bonanza and so forth. Yet, I hear a Rans S20 called an "Experimental" - whatever that means! Do any of you with ELSA certificates announce as "experimental 12345" or do you call yourself a Flight Design 12345 experimental (first call only)?
  8. Carol said the initials LSRM-(class, such as airplane, glider, etc) was suggested by the FAA Light Sport Branch years ago. She didn't cite a document that establishes those initials. She said "The sign off just needs your rating, your limitation, and class of training, your certificate number and your name," Reading from the back of my certificate, it says: XII RATINGS REPAIRMAN LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT XIII LIMITATIONS MAINTENANCE: AIRPLANE, GLIDER
  9. Carol said the initials LSRM-(class, such as airplane, glider, etc) was suggested by the FAA Light Sport Branch years ago. She didn't cite a document that establishes those initials. She said "The sign off just needs your rating, your limitation, and class of training, your certificate number and your name," Reading from the back of my certificate, it says: XII RATINGS REPAIRMAN LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT XIII LIMITATIONS MAINTENANCE: AIRPLANE, GLIDER That infers to me that when I inspect my FD CTSW I can sign off as: RLSA/M-A 2178898 James N Meade and that is what I intend to do. If anyone asks me what it stands for I'll haul out my certificate and let them read it.
  10. "Light Sport rules demand all operations are performed in VFR. " If one reads the quote interpreting Light Sport to mean Sport Pilot meaning either holding a sport pilot certificate or flying under sport pilot privileges then the meaning is correct even if the wording is wrong. If it is read as "light sport aircraft" then it is inaccurate. A Piper Cub is a light sport aircraft, as was my old Champ, both of which have a standard aircraft certificate as well as is my FDCTSW which has a Light Sport certificate. Light sport aircraft can be flown above the clouds under some circumstances. Using statistics from Wikipedia (not usually cited as an authoritative source) the assumption may be made that the Sport Pilot certificate holders have no higher rating and of course must fly light sport aircraft if PIC. However, anyone with a higher rating can fly under Sport Pilot privileges if they qualify under the medical regulations. I have an ATP rating and used to fly under Sport Pilot privileges because I let my medical lapse. When flying under Sport Pilot privileges, even though I hold an ATP, I could not fly above a solid deck because I had no visual contact with the ground. I am willing to bet money that most people on this forum are here because they are or were flying under sport pilot privileges and therefore were restricted as PIC to light sport aircraft. I suppose a poll would sort that out if one answers polls. No matter what, this discussion is a good reminder that the FAA definitions can seem confusing and it's helpful to all of us, myself first and foremost, to try for precision when talking about these issues. I guess that is why there were so many questions on the FAA exams, (at least there were 40 years ago) about the various certificates and what was included under them. Anyone want to talk about the definition of "night"? No?
  11. I sent Carol an email. Let's see what she says.
  12. I know that Carol and Bryan Carpenter use the term LSMR-A and said in the class I took a dozen years ago that the FAA recognized that abbreviation. I assume it means Light Sport Maintenance Repairman-Airplane. I have always used the abbreviation RLSA-A: It is the abbreviation for the title on my FAA certificate that says I am a Repairman Light Sport Aircraft-Airplane/Glider (since I have the glider add-on rating). Where did LSRM-A come from specifically, does anyone know?
  13. It is my understanding that swirls are the result of using a circular motion when addressing the windshield. I've heard one uses an inline straight motion to prevent creation of swirls.
  14. Put another way, the prohibition on flying over a solid layer with no visual contact with the ground has nothing to do with the aircraft. It has to do with pilots flying under Sport Pilot privileges, as pointed out above and specified in 61.315. The prohibition is on the pilot, not the airplane. A person flying under higher than sport pilot privileges may fly a light sport aircraft over a solid layer legally. (Always to careful to check the operating limitations for that specific aircraft). It helps if we are careful to make sure when we talk about "light sport" that we are talking about an airplane, not the pilot privileges. When we talk about flying under "sport pilot" rules we are talking about pilots, not the aircraft. Light sport = airplane, defined in 1.1 Sport pilot = person defined in 61.3xx series.
  15. I might have been hauling seed corn from Iowa for export to Japan, not sure now. I was loaded, that's for sure (the truck, that is).
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