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Ed Cesnalis

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Everything posted by Ed Cesnalis

  1. Ed Cesnalis

    Glider tape question?

    I'm sorta forced to use yellow tape which means no Bolus for me. Its still no big deal and comes out as okay as the rest of the plane. If I let the leading edge on the wing root wear out I get a stall warning that I enjoy.
  2. Ed Cesnalis

    Humphreys close up for Mike

    @Mike Koerner
  3. Ed Cesnalis

    Vne

    Agreed, I generally have to use TAS numbers but my high speed descents are usually 135kts.
  4. Ed Cesnalis

    over shooting 6500 Rpm

    I assumed you needed a prop to prevent it from easily overspeeding? That was true of my 'early' Rotax.
  5. Ed Cesnalis

    Vne

    Temps in the 30s this morning so I climbed to 14,000' in 10 minutes and tested out steeply bank descents to get into position for photos in these canyons: Its easy to see why you would do this for a fire / emergency descent. The rotation is relaxed and the view gives situational awareness in spades, good thing to have when screaming down thru the layers.
  6. @Tom Baker I do encourage you to do some descending unloaded turns, even base to final overshoot preventing turns. You are negating good emergency technique for a false concern. I can get 3gs with 0* bank or I can get 0-1g with 90* bank. Bank isn't adding stress the stress at higher bank comes from the stab attempting to maintain altitude in that bank. Certainly the rudder can introduce forces too but not big like the stab.
  7. Ed Cesnalis

    Vne

    I do this on my way home sometimes and its the descending unloaded turn we were talking about earlier. I don't want to pull back on the stick near Vne but bank alone is quite comfortable. In my CTSW if I was doing the emergency descent near Vne then I know my wings are unloaded otherwise I couldn't get that high speed.
  8. Ed Cesnalis

    Vne

    Mine is about like that.
  9. Ed Cesnalis

    LSA Proposed Rulemaking - Jan. 2019

    For me, the first real limiting factor is climb. I don't want to fly my CT even at gross very much. Available climb is a real get out of jail free card at times.
  10. Ed Cesnalis

    LSA Proposed Rulemaking - Jan. 2019

    I'm 65 years old and own a 12 year old CTSW. Will and how will this sweeping change effect me?
  11. Ed Cesnalis

    LSA Proposed Rulemaking - Jan. 2019

    This gets exciting when you look forward. The limits will be set then the designs exploiting the new limits will emerge and aviation will take an interesting leap sideways.
  12. Ed Cesnalis

    Awesome new seat in my CTLSi

    Your prop has way to much pitch. To realize best speed you need 7,500' DA, so look for and optimize for speed as high up as you can. 5,200 @ (throttled back) < 5,350RPM @ < 7,500' DA = ~ 55% power, increase power to 75% to find good cruise numbers!
  13. Ed Cesnalis

    Awesome new seat in my CTLSi

    Andy, How do you determine 'cruise' speed? For me, especially since I cruise well above 7,500'DA Cruise speed is what I get in level flight with a wide open throttle. My prop pitch allows 5,500RPM @ 10,000'. My cruise degrades with altitude, my 105kt level is ~14,000' Some of your cruise power could be unavailable because your prop is too flat or even too course or by an artificial RPM limitation. (like you cruise at 5,200 RPM) Its not unreasonable to cruise at reduced RPM but if its bringing you well below 75% power then you won't realize the speed.
  14. Ed Cesnalis

    LSA Proposed Rulemaking - Jan. 2019

    150kt, 3600lb, 4passenger are the only increases. There are so many planes out there under 3600lbs but have prop or gear complexity. What goes 150 with fixed gear and fixed prop?
  15. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    totally I've had this come into play at fields with parallel runways, crosswinds and judgement errors. What are you going to do at that moment when you realize you are going to drift into the parallel's short final?
  16. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    In most cases there is no value because for most aircraft turning short final their altitude is critical to a stable approach. If you overshoot at 30 it takes 2 more turns at 30 to get back and your getting down to the last minute. If you prevent the overshoot at 50 and loose extra 75' doing it its not an issue for my CTSW and I don't have to make those last 2 turns. Stabilized approaches don't mean much at all to me in the CT. Wind shear at home means they are often not possible and often when I do I get disturbed as I'm rounding out anyway.
  17. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    Sure but there are 2 places I use it and one where I use it often and the proof is in the pudding. Occasionally (perhaps a north wind at our field) I'll have an overshoot final issue in the pattern and I do solve it with this technique. Often when I'm flying in a canyon, usually after I fire my camera it is time to exit. If a level turn will do it I use one because I don't give up altitude for no reason but in most cases as I sense the drift into the canyon wall is a concern I use a steep descending turn to get out. The proof is in the fact that it works. It takes lateral distance to make a turn but in 3 dimensions you can roll that a bit and climb for a chandelle / wing over or descend for a steep turn, same principal.
  18. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    I do it more at cruise speed then at pattern speed. (Its my most common canyon exit). I'm either trimmed for level cruise or 55kts, in either case its mostly a matter of no back pressure (let the trim fly) The nose drops on its own seeking trim speed when you are in a steep bank, the turn radius is minimal for the bank angle but its smaller and adjustable. In almost all cases you can let the trim handle the speed and attitude while you increase bank to needed radius, when done resume normal cruise or approach. I don't think you can increase the load factor and stall speed without pulling back on the stick. If you let the nose fall to trim speed it feels as the load factor doesn't increase at all. In a CT you don't have to pull back much for that to change big time of course.
  19. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    Sure, while I"m trimmed for 55 knots that's still stab input and its the biggest variable. Think little yank but lots of bank. The extra bank and loss of altitude tighten your turn the lack of yank does it without approaching stall. When its all done my approach is lower but well within comfort for my slow/nimble CT.
  20. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    this unloaded turn abandons constant glide as needed to keep the wing from loading. it trades some altitude for a low g turn and because its a CT re-establishing the new final is leisurely.
  21. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    There is and its huge. Its not wing loading alone, stall speed and wing span and airfoil all play big parts. There is a wide spectrum with many designs requiring better than average pilots to keep within a safe envelope. Their speeds are likely 20kts higher and their stall / spin warning perhaps non-existent. The extra speed alone says the 500' elevation is problematic. Have you ever been to an ultra light field with a 300' pattern? You could fly a CTSW into such a field pretty comfortably and a 210 couldn't do it. AT that 500' point the 210 has the altitude it needs compared to the CTSW could work with a fraction of that, therefore the CTSW's descending turn that loses little altitude fits in nicely.
  22. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    I find 45° to be quite comfortable, even a normal turn for my CTSW. I'm coasting in at 55kts, I can really bank as steeply as I want if I don't pull back or change the trim. I don't need to pick up that much speed so I keep my ASI at 62kts if needed. All in all I find a 40°+ angle to be safer in my CT because I can see again in 10 seconds and it feels right.
  23. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    90° at 500' would be excessive silly. All you really need is a centered (trim) stick and no back pressure.
  24. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    we have a right and left traffic field. I don't limit bank really so maybe I have an excessive angle at times. Turning a CT steeper than other planes that are heavier and / or have longer wings makes sense everywhere not just in the pattern, the extra visibility often works.
  25. Ed Cesnalis

    Flaps for Landing

    A CTSW will roll to any bank angle without stalling, it is well capable of doing rolls. How is this possible? My CTSW will do a descending turn at 90° and 1G or less. How is this possible? You have your formulas that says stall increases with bank and while that can be true in real life its not the bank but the aft stick that causing the stall. Remove the aft stick and change to a descending turn and that stall business goes away.
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