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FlyingMonkey

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Everything posted by FlyingMonkey

  1. The problem is that most cheap "over the counter" solutions are not Ph-neutral. Higher or lower Ph can attack the foam cores under the carbon fiber if it gets in there, and cause delamination and sagging of structures. It has happened on several CTs.
  2. In the hangar I keep a bucket of water with Composiclean bucket wash mixed in. For bugs I just dunk a cloth in the bucket and rub the bugs off, then dry with another cloth. Easy and works well. I change the bucket water about every 3 months or so.
  3. FlyingMonkey

    Clacking Brakes on taxi and landing

    My Matco brakes make some noose when taxiing. It's normal with the floating calipers on both brake types. No big deal. I think it's usually worse on the CTSW than the CTLS due to the stiffer gear legs.
  4. FlyingMonkey

    Sticky brakes on 2007 CTSW?

    Are your pads over worn? If they get too worn down the piston can get tilted and the brakes won't release.
  5. FlyingMonkey

    Going Experimental

    While technically that is true, in reality it'll never happen. The factory would have to agree to "accept" the airplane back into SLSA status, and no factory is likely to ever do that due to liability concerns. Once it's ELSA, you should consider it a permanent change.
  6. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    BTW, one can overbalance tanks if not paying attention. On one trip I set up a slip to transfer fuel, then got busy picking my way around some marginal weather. When I got back to checking fuel I had transferred almost twice what I wanted to, and had to transfer back the other way. Bill's 10-15min rule of thumb is good, you might even want to set a timer... 😉
  7. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    Especially if my airplane will sit a few hours or more before flying, I always fuel just the left. The fuel will transfer to the right until they are roughly even in that amount of time. If I'm going to fly right away and the tanks are both equally low I will fuel them both. It would certainly be valid to fill one tank and balance them in flight as well. I wouldn't take off unless I could see fuel in both tubes though. YMMV. In fact, I have my tubes marked at 10g, 5g and 2.5g lines on each side. The 5g lines are my "no take off" lines. I have flown below that level on long flight legs, but I don't take off with less fuel than that unless I'm staying in the pattern and keeping the flight short (for testing after maintenance, for example). The 2.5g lines are the "I must be on the ground" lines. These lines have kept me out of trouble and with about double VFR reserve fuel about for 5 years now.
  8. FlyingMonkey

    Mactan Cebu to Sicogon Is

    I think we might need two of them...it's 2471 miles from the closst point on the US West Coast to Hawaii, about 2.5 times the CT's range. With two we could do it without modding the CTs, with a single "carrier" we could make the trip with additional fuel installed. In any case, I like where you're going with this! Is there a tailhook LoA? 🤪
  9. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    Hey Mike... My experience has been that for a given power setting, flying uncoordinated enough to transfer fuel from one tank to another (usually 1/2 to 1 ball out of center) has no appreciable effect on flight efficiency. I mean, I'm sure it *does* create some more drag, but in several tests I've conducted I have seen no speed decrease when doing this that required more power to compensate. In my mind, it's is a "cost free" operation to keep the tanks balanced. Though as always, pilots should rely on their own experience and testing, and not the lies and deceit propagated on the internet.
  10. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    My point was that with 34 gallons your tanks should never both get very low. In five years I have never landed with less than 6-7 gallons, and when it gets less than ten total I always make sure to keep the tanks roughly level. My opinion of course, YMMV.
  11. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    Entirely circumstances dependent! I can think of some situations where it would be a major f*@!^# event.
  12. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    The good news is that we have 34 gallons of fuel capacity, more than any other LSA except the Sling (I think). That means we have a lot of range, and no excuses for running out of fuel. As an example, last year I flew from the Atlanta area (KWDR) to Suwanee Belle (9FL0), a distance of 235nm. I left with about 30 gallons of fuel. I flew down, spent the day, and flew back that afternoon. Never put a drop of fuel in the airplane, and landed with 8 gallons remaining. I watched it carefully on the way back and would have stopped for fuel if needed, but it wasn't. I just used rudder trim to keep the tanks roughly level, that was it. Most other LSA have 20 gallons of fuel capacity, and just can't do that. That's one of the reasons the CT is such a great travel airplane. I guess my point is the airplane will outfly your bladder capacity, so just put plenty of fuel in for your intended flight, keep the tanks roughly even, and you can put the rest out of your mind.
  13. FlyingMonkey

    500fpm, 60 knots, 15 degrees flaps

    Slips do not require a "nose up attitude". With 30° flaps the attitude in a landing slip is quite nose low, even down to 45kt. You do have to hold the nose up a bit to avoid picking up speed, but not to anywhere near a nose high attitude (which I would consider above the horizon, maybe you mean something different). IMO, 50kt is too slow for a 15° flaps approach. It can be done, but you are going to have an "impressive" sink rate that must be arrested before touchdown. If you miss-time the roundout too early, you can be out of energy and in for a "carrier style" landing. Too late and you sink through ground effect for the same result. My 15° calm wind approaches don't generally get slower than 55kt, maybe 52kt if wind is dead calm. If I want to land slower than that, and/or land on a short runway I will use 30° flaps.
  14. FlyingMonkey

    ELSA possible fuel flow fix???

    I don't think this is wise, personally. It leads to a complex fuel system that has three valves (the on/off fuel valve and now one for each tank), all of which can fail and one of which is clear across the cockpit from the pilot. If you forget to open a valve and run the only active tank low, it would be very easy to unport the active tank and cause an unintentional engine stoppage. If the active tank was the left, now you have to lean across the cockpit to get to the valve to correct the situation, all while trying to manage glide speed. If that happens at the pattern, at low altitude or airspeed, you could be in an off airport landing situation very quickly. When I went ELSA I looked into replacing the simple on/off fuel valve with a left/right/both valve. One issue is there is no good place on the panel for it that makes logical sense with the fuel line routing, so you'd probably need to move it to the side of the tunnel or the mushroom by the pilot's leg. That means it would have to be manipulated by feel and you could not visually verify the position...not good. In the end I abandoned the idea; the CT fuel system is very simple, and is designed to make sure the engine always has fuel, right up to the point of running both tanks empty. That's a good thing. The fuel flow from one tank or another is easily managed with the rudder trim wheel, so the need for a fuel system to manage that aspect is kind of unnecessary. After flying this airplane for five years, managing fuel on long flights using the trim method has become second nature, and is very predictable and accurate.
  15. FlyingMonkey

    Flight Design Back Up To Speed!

    AOPA article: https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2019/january/31/flight-design-back-up-to-speed?fbclid=IwAR2-ZHCHHJDUkRJUDDp-LmnytqVb1lAQ-chgqTpC2QXTxDPczeFFPiyjIos
  16. FlyingMonkey

    Flight Design Back Up To Speed!

    I think the consensus is that the CTLS improves two aspects: 1) Landing gear is more forgiving - not an issue because the new airplane has the uprated CTLS gear. 2) The shorter fuselage of the CTSW makes it a little more yaw happy and "squirrelly" in rough air. I have flown in some pretty bad turbulence and it's manageable, but a little more yaw stability would certainly be a good thing. And of course the hat rack. Kind of a joke but the rack also gives rear quarter windows, which I really would like; the CTSW rear view is pretty bad.
  17. FlyingMonkey

    Departing the big city in a CTSW

    How long was that selfie stick?!? 😁
  18. FlyingMonkey

    Pitch control binding

    There are a lot of Inox products. Which do you use Roger?
  19. I didn't ask for it, the DAR just added it in. I think he said he puts in all limitations that the FAA allows when he does a conversion. Other inspectors certsinly do things differently. I think the ELSA change was one of the best decisions I ever made. I know longer have to ask factory permission to put in a different type of battery or other part, and having taken the 16 hour repairman course, I can do any maintenance I'm comfortable doing, including condition inspections. I have not yet seen a downside, but any impact to perceived value would only be seen at sale time.
  20. My ELSA operating limitations allow IFR flight if the airplane is properly equipped. Just saying. I'm a SP so not for me, but that GPS unit would not be overkill if I were a PP interested in IFR.
  21. FlyingMonkey

    Smart offering...

    Big bore is cool, I don’t know what longevity looks like. Honestly, as an average joe lowlander, I’m content with 100hp in a standard atmosphere at sea level. It’s been working for me for five years.
  22. FlyingMonkey

    Smart offering...

    I agree with all your points, but it's not all sunshine for the FI engine. It's heavier by about 22lb, and requires electricity to keep running the injectors or it quits. That means a more complex electrical system, usually with dual batteries, dual alternators, etc. It's also not really maintainable by the average joe, so for an ELSA owner like me that is a downside. Carb icing is generally a non-issue with the 912 series; I have seen it in my airplane one time in 500 hours, and it cleared immediately with carb heat. If you pull warm cowl air into the engine like a lot of designs do (like the RV-12) with the filters right on the carbs you don't even need carb heat, though there might be a very slight power penalty. I'm not saying the ULS is preferable, just that there are plusses and minuses to both. I think they are both great engines.
  23. FlyingMonkey

    Smart offering...

    I told you E-LSA was pretty cool. Glad you finally listened! 😎 I'm sure FD would sell you the knobs as an option if you don't mind a "porky" CT. I have to say, an updated and lightweight CTSW hits all my check boxes. If I were shopping for a new LSA I'd be calling FD tomorrow. Now they just need a tailwheel version...
  24. FlyingMonkey

    Smart offering...

    It weighs 6oz, and they wanted to hit that 600lb useful load target, because the brochures were already written...
  25. FlyingMonkey

    Smart offering...

    In the panel pic you can just see the top of the fuel valve slot at the bottom. So i'd say no -- just the simple CTSW on/off valve.
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