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Roger Lee

Exhaust spring and header wrap picture

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Hi Eric,

 

I can't tell you all my tricks. I've had a few of those knuckles as well.

 

Well okay.

I use a pair of 12" long needle nose pliers. I took my Dremel and cut small ridges on both sides of the inner jaws for a good grip. I grab the bottom loop of the spring and when standing up just lean down a little and use my weight verses using all arm strength and the spring comes right off. I do it in reverse when putting them back on. They are easy to do this way. 

 

Sometimes I use those same pliers to get at hard to reach coolant compression springs.

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I have a short length of the kind of chain you hang a ceiling fan with.

 

Hook a link into the spring loop, and a screwdriver into another link at a convenient distance. And pull.

 

Works for me!

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At last Oshkosh I bought special tool from rotax distributor for about $20. They told me not to grab with pliers b/c that's what what leads to spring fail. I've also seen similar tool at auto supply store used to adjust headlights. Also, seen my mechanic use length of 1/4" diameter nylon rope.

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If you use the needle-nose pliers correctly they won't damage or leave marks ion the spring. It is constant slipping or sharp edged tools that can cause some damage.

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Hi Eric,

 

I can't tell you all my tricks. I've had a few of those knuckles as well.

 

Well okay.

I use a pair of 12" long needle nose pliers. I took my Dremel and cut small ridges on both sides of the inner jaws for a good grip. I grab the bottom loop of the spring and when standing up just lean down a little and use my weight verses using all arm strength and the spring comes right off. I do it in reverse when putting them back on. They are easy to do this way. 

 

Sometimes I use those same pliers to get at hard to reach coolant compression springs.

I use the same technique with one addition - a good pair of Welsl-Lamont leather work gloves. I don't slip often but it only takes once to get your attention. :(

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Just wanted to post here, I finally wrapped one of our aircraft. I used DEI's "Titanium" wrap. I didn't care much for all the marketing (they say it's lava rock mixed into fiberglass, I see no actual titanium or other metals used, which is a good thing), but the big point was no silicone coating needed like with other wraps... I wasn't too keen on the idea of putting that stuff on.

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Just wanted to post here, I finally wrapped one of our aircraft. I used DEI's "Titanium" wrap. I didn't care much for all the marketing (they say it's lava rock mixed into fiberglass, I see no actual titanium used, which is a good thing), but the big point was no silicone coating needed... I wasn't too keen on the idea of putting that stuff on.

 

How much does it take to wrap both sides?

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I had the exhaust off. Figured might as well do it then. I think I used around 20 feet.

 

It won't be easy to do while installed. You want to pull this stuff TIGHT, and it's also important that you control the overlap so you don't get hotspots. I would say that's especially true on the outside of the elbow, that's where a lot of the heat ends up in exhausts.

 

Expect to spend a few hours cursing as you get the hang of it :P.

 

BY THE WAY: For anyone with an air cooled engine with the idea of trying out wrapping: you better be damn careful. In air cooled engines, the exhaust is part of the cylinder cooling system. I'd say for those applications, only wrap small sections that get close to any hoses or wiring, or wrap the at-risk hoses and wiring areas instead.

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I never take any part of the exhaust system apart. I do it right in place. I takes me about 1 hr.

15 minutes per pipe and it's easy to keep tight. I do use a pair of needlenose pliers down around the spring as it can be a tad snug between some pipes and the spring. Some are no big deal.

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Interesting question:

 

The carb heat on the CT is just a flap opening the intake to warm, under-cowl air.  If the exhaust is wrapped, will the effectiveness of carb heat be reduced?

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I never take any part of the exhaust system apart. I do it right in place. I takes me about 1 hr.

15 minutes per pipe and it's easy to keep tight. I do use a pair of needlenose pliers down around the spring as it can be a tad snug between some pipes and the spring. Some are no big deal.

 

Says the guy with experience. :P. For the uninitiated, a few hours is pretty reasonable to do a full job.

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