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Dynon Skyview V10

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Minor issue. Dynon says $795 here, but $800 for a refurb unit more recently.

Yes, you cannot update an S-LSA to version 10 without the corresponding update in the POH from the manufacturer.

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It's 800 for the refurb, while something in the vicinity of 2k for a new unit.

 

Can someone send me a CTLSi POH? I would like to see what in those manuals are causing problems with updating skyview.

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It's 800 for the refurb, while something in the vicinity of 2k for a new unit.

 

Can someone send me a CTLSi POH? I would like to see what in those manuals are causing problems with updating skyview.

CTLS FLIGHT MANUAL.pdf

 

CTLSi_Supplement.pdf

 

The CTLS POH is supplemented with the CTLSi Supplement.  Both should be available from above attachments

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I glanced over the POH. I'm not seeing where the statements or limitations lie that cause FD to not allow people to just use the latest skyview software. The only potential problem I could see is the specific sensor settings, but those could also be changed in the D-series Dynon Avionics...

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I have been down this road mistakenly thinking it was good to have the latest update on my Skyview displays. The next FD update was not compatible. My only option would have been to send them to Dynon to have them downgraded. As it turned out I waited and the next FD update worked (with a small glitch involving the fuel pressure sender).

I think the issue is that the displays are the primary flight instruments which makes them different than GPS updates.

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I still do not understand why it matters though. Even if dynon changed the way the instruments are laid out, it's still going to be standard flight instrumentation. The kind of instrumentation that is required by regulation, no matter what kind of airplane, be it standard or experimental, are required to have.

 

As I understand, FD is one of the few companies (if not the only company), that is tightly controlling updates to skyview. Which, again, I have to ask, why?

 

EDIT 10/31/14: I forgot to edit this to put in the reason. After discussion the issue with FDUSA, it appears that there are EASA requirements where certain gauges, such as engine status, must ALWAYS be displayed. There are other requirements too, but that's the big one. When FD moved to the D series avionics from Dynon, they did not realize the requirements apply to glass as well.

 

By the time they found out, they were already moving to skyview, so they focused on skyview software.

 

This is apparently a big issue with the FAA as well, and a lot of companies are finding out the hard way that certification applies to very specific configurations, and if you allow the pilot to change settings, it becomes a deviation from certification.

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Though I've never posted, I've appreciated the active and helpful nature of these forums since purchasing my '12 CTLS. Like some of you, I follow Dynon's updates out of curiosity... or perhaps simply to torture myself about features we may one day have. And like a few over-eager CT owners, I too earned the opportunity to ship my Displays to Woodinville during the 6.2/7.0 fiasco. Anyway, Dave Armando was kind enough to e-mail me unlock files for my two screens last week when I told him what I wanted to do and this week while my 2-year VFR check was performed I had the avionics shop run two simple wires from the SL40 to each screen. With a few small serial port configuration changes, I now get to see the active and standby frequencies with identifier codes (and DUAL/TX indicators) in the top bar of the Skyview Displays. Totally overkill since I often use the 796 "tap/push" feature to tune the SL40 but I also often tune manually and if you're like me I'm sure there's been a time that you were in the pattern making your calls and that little voice inside you made you look at the COM and ask, "is that the right frequency?" Anyway, I like the feature... it took about 30 minutes and since we've not had anything from FD/Dynon in some time, I made my own little update. The functionality was included in 6.0 I think with the release of the Dynon COM radio and works with quite a few devices. Anyway, PIN 3 of the SL40 to available serial port RX on each of the Skyview units is all that's needed.

 

And here's a picture:

 

post-948-0-54589800-1414734558_thumb.jpg

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Hi,

 

I just wanted to dispel any questions on this.

 

FD GmbH has produced and is flight testing the latest software version 11.1.  It is at Dynon for final vetting now.

 

The POH Supplements are in final review.  I would estimate that in November they will be released.

 

If you wish to switch to the touch screen, each aircraft will required an individual MRA, found on our website under support,  which is submitted to myself. (TopService@FlightDesignUSA.com)

 

The cost is $ 150.00 for the production, filing, and permanent record storage. 

 

Thank you,

 

Dave Armando

FD USA

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Dave thank you for the update. Is there any functionality that you're aware of in 11.1 that will be disabled by FD?

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. . . "FD GmbH has produced and is flight testing the latest software version 11.1.  It is at Dynon for final vetting now.

The POH Supplements are in final review.  I would estimate that in November they will be released.

If you wish to switch to the touch screen, each aircraft will required an individual MRA, found on our website under support,  which is submitted to myself. (TopService@FlightDesignUSA.com)

The cost is $ 150.00 for the production, filing, and permanent record storage."

 

Thank you,

 

Dave Armando

FD USA

 

Thanks for the info Dave.  That is great news.

Will the upgrade to software version 11.1 also apply to the SV-D700 display?

Will the CTSW POH Supplement also be included?  I hope so.

It should be, because the SV-D700 is identical in functionality to the SV-D1000.

 

There are several of us out here, using the smaller SV-D700 in the CTSW.

We just don't want to get left behind! . . . . . . :)

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Hi,

 

I just wanted to dispel any questions on this.

 

FD GmbH has produced and is flight testing the latest software version 11.1.  It is at Dynon for final vetting now.

 

The POH Supplements are in final review.  I would estimate that in November they will be released.

 

If you wish to switch to the touch screen, each aircraft will required an individual MRA, found on our website under support,  which is submitted to myself. (TopService@FlightDesignUSA.com)

 

The cost is $ 150.00 for the production, filing, and permanent record storage. 

 

Thank you,

 

Dave Armando

FD USA

 I have 2010 CTLS with Dual Dynon Sky view, and a Garmin 796. Frankly, touchscreen (796) becomes a challenge in turbulence. Other than a new operating system , what would be the advantage to going to 11.1 version,  on my Skyview's ?

 

Cheers

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 I have 2010 CTLS with Dual Dynon Sky view, and a Garmin 796. Frankly, touchscreen (796) becomes a challenge in turbulence. Other than a new operating system , what would be the advantage to going to 11.1 version,  on my Skyview's ?

 

Cheers

Won't know the advantages until 11.1 comes out and then we will see what it allows.  6.2 was very restrictive and severely limited the abilities of the Dynon's.  I hope 11.1 releases some of those restrictions.

 

I actually prefer the touch screen in turbulence over the 696 so I think the dynon touch screen would be an improvement. 

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Duane, at least 6.2 allowed a screen swap which lets you poor the map in front of you and put the pod in front of another pilot if they fly with you.

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Duane, at least 6.2 allowed a screen swap which lets you poor the map in front of you and put the pod in front of another pilot if they fly with you.

That's true about the screen swap but with Dynon's 6.0, you had 16 different screen choices.  6.2 was very limiting - does not allow full eng info or full dynon nav on either side.  Only have 20% engine gauges and they took away inflight menu and inflight expert autopilot -- I could go on...

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[snip] what would be the advantage to going to 11.1 version,  on my Skyview's ?

 

Generally speaking, I feel like we have access to most of the important features of 6.2 -- except the advanced autopilot. I suspect most know but there has been quite a few features introduced since then. In case anyone hasn't seen the list, it's on Dynon's site.

 

http://www.dynonavionics.com/docs/WhatsNew_SkyView.html

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Generally speaking, I feel like we have access to most of the important features of 6.2 -- except the advanced autopilot. I suspect most know but there has been quite a few features introduced since then. In case anyone hasn't seen the list, it's on Dynon's site.

 

http://www.dynonavionics.com/docs/WhatsNew_SkyView.html

Thanks for the answer, looking at your link, I agree we have most of the useful features in ver. 6.2. My autopilot ocilates a bit , when the winds aloft are high and/or with thermals. However in low or calm winds the autopilot is rock solid. I hand fly most of the time and not use the autopilot unless, I have a flight that will last well over an Hr. So essentially 11.1 ver. does not sound like a big improvement , in my case.

 

Cheers

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The autopilot servos in the CT are not industrial strength.  They will break loose in sudden gusts and turbulence.  Be aware of that...

Thanks for the PIREP, I will keep that in mind.

 

Cheers

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. . . "The autopilot servos in the CT are not industrial strength.  They will break loose in sudden gusts and turbulence." . . .

Thanks for the PIREP, I will keep that in mind.

 

Just for the record, that is not correct.

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Just for the record. I have personal experience with it....and you once again show your ignorance over this aircraft.  Dynon techs admitted the standard servos are not suitable for high winds or sudden strong turbulence.  To get those kind of servos, one needs to upgrade to servos that can handle much heavier aircraft.

 

I had a pitch servo break loose twice in gusts at 10k feet.  The servos are designed with a load pin that breaks if the gust is strong enough to damage the servos or interfere with control of the aircraft.  Luckily the pins remained intact and I was able to respond quickly and retake control after the servo released and the nose pitched down suddenly.

 

From SkyView Pilot’s User Guide - Revision R,  page 8-1

 

Servo Failsafe

 

"The Dynon Avionics Autopilot is designed with multiple failsafe features to ensure that the autopilot can always be disabled, even in the event of electronic or mechanical failure.

First, the required disconnect switch commands the servos to disengage directly, ensuring that the pilot can always override SkyView’s commands.

Next, the Autopilot servos are designed so that the pilot can always overpower them and move the control stick/yoke manually with minimal force, even when the servo is operating at its highest torque output capability.

When the servos are not receiving power, they revert to their normal power-off state. Thus, simply opening the Autopilot circuit breaker or fuse on in the aircraft will completely inhibit the Autopilot servos from controlling the airplane.

However, SkyView does continuously look for the presence of powered-up servos, even when the autopilot is disengaged, and will show an error condition if they are not communicating with the rest of the system. Therefore, Dynon Avionics recommends that the servos be powered on whenever SkyView is powered on in routine operation. When the servos are receiving power but the autopilot is not engaged, the servos draw negligible power.

Finally, in the unlikely event of an internal catastrophic failure of the servo, moderate but firm force on the control/stick yoke will physically decouple the servo internals from its link to the aircraft control surface. This action breaks a specially-designed shear screw which is designed to yield in this scenario to preserve positive pilot control of the aircraft."

 

This has nothing to do with external weather conditions as you reference in your post.

What's more, your servos did not "break loose" as you report.  They were "slipping" and I am sure you had a SkyView message indicating that.

Why don't you get your act together and do some research before posting?

You have a history here and your credibility has been in serious question for some time.

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So essentially 11.1 ver. does not sound like a big improvement , in my case.

 

I suspect that's probably true for most. I enjoy the subtleties of some of the feature updates like the tail # displaying on ADS-B traffic targets, named GPS sources, weather dots based on ADS-B METAR data, auto BARO based on METAR data or the new wide view for Synthetic vision. I'm also curious to experience things like the geo-referenced airport diagrams supported since v7.0 and the Altitude Intercept Arc. I did have the SV-ADSB-470 module and antenna installed in my 2012 and Dave A was kind enough to point out I should have obtained a Major Repair and Alteration Data Approval (oops) so he arranged to have one issued. From my experience FD USA has been fantastic in that regard. Anyway, a lot of the new functionality does seem to benefit only those Skyview systems equipped with the ADS-B module. 

 

And my AP wanders (oscillates) a lot too. Has since 5.0 when I first started flying this CTLS. I adjusted servo sensitivity back when Dynon would still take calls from FD owners (I think mine is at 19?) but it didn't help much. Not that I use AP much -- flying along like I'm hanging from a pendulum gets old and fails to impress any of my passengers.

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Just for the record. I have personal experience with it....and you once again show your ignorance over this aircraft.  Dynon techs admitted the standard servos are not suitable for high winds or sudden strong turbulence.  To get those kind of servos, one needs to upgrade to servos that can handle much heavier aircraft.

 

I had a pitch servo break loose twice in gusts at 10k feet.  The servos are designed with a load pin that breaks if the gust is strong enough to damage the servos or interfere with control of the aircraft.  Luckily the pins remained intact and I was able to respond quickly and retake control after the servo released and the nose pitched down suddenly.

---------------------------------------------------------------

From SkyView Pilot’s User Guide - Revision R,  page 8-1

 

Servo Failsafe

 

"The Dynon Avionics Autopilot is designed with multiple failsafe features to ensure that the autopilot can always be disabled, even in the event of electronic or mechanical failure.

First, the required disconnect switch commands the servos to disengage directly, ensuring that the pilot can always override SkyView’s commands.

Next, the Autopilot servos are designed so that the pilot can always overpower them and move the control stick/yoke manually with minimal force, even when the servo is operating at its highest torque output capability.

When the servos are not receiving power, they revert to their normal power-off state. Thus, simply opening the Autopilot circuit breaker or fuse on in the aircraft will completely inhibit the Autopilot servos from controlling the airplane.

However, SkyView does continuously look for the presence of powered-up servos, even when the autopilot is disengaged, and will show an error condition if they are not communicating with the rest of the system. Therefore, Dynon Avionics recommends that the servos be powered on whenever SkyView is powered on in routine operation. When the servos are receiving power but the autopilot is not engaged, the servos draw negligible power.

Finally, in the unlikely event of an internal catastrophic failure of the servo, moderate but firm force on the control/stick yoke will physically decouple the servo internals from its link to the aircraft control surface. This action breaks a specially-designed shear screw which is designed to yield in this scenario to preserve positive pilot control of the aircraft."

 

This has nothing to do with external weather conditions as you reference in your post.

What's more, your servos did not "break loose" as you report.  They were "slipping" and I am sure you had a SkyView message indicating that.

Why don't you get your act together and do some research before posting?

You have a history here and your credibility has been in serious question for some time.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Bill,

 

Your understanding is correct.

 

Sincerely,

Dave Armando

 

Director of Maintenance

Flight Design USA

(860) 963-7272

www.flightdesignusa.com

------------------------------------------

On 11/3/2014 4:02 PM, Bill Ince wrote:

 

Hi Dave,

 
I saw this post on the CT Flier Forum site today.  The post was authored by “100Hamburger”.
Can you please post a forum comment, if this information is correct or false?  I think he is putting out false information.
 
The thread title is “Dynon SkyView V10”, page 2, post #25.
 
It is my understanding that “gusty winds and turbulence” will not “break loose” a servo.  If the system cannot handle the turbulence, the servo merely “slips,” and a SkyView message will indicate that.  On the other hand, if the servo freezes or becomes jammed, the “pin” he is referring to, will shear, allowing the pilot to override the servo.
 
Thank you in advance,
 
Bill

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