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Flying Bozo

What is this thing??

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Can anybody tell me what this thing is? I found it on the hangar floor near my airplane a CTSW and don't know where it came from or what it might be. If it is something that is from the CT let me know so that I can replace it.

Thanks

Larry

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Thanks Roger and Bill. I am relieved that Roger has never seen it on a CT so I can have some peace of mind in flying. I couldn't imagine what it was from so needed others familiar with CT to chime in. That is funny about the compressor since I think that is the only other thing that I have had rolling around the hangar floor. I will check in the morning and see if it could be from that.

Larry

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That is the CT structure fitting, the one that ties the whole structure together.   :D

 

Just kidding of course.  It almost looks to me like the guide for a pull cord/chain for a ceiling fan.  Does your hangar have a ceiling fan?

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That is the CT structure fitting, the one that ties the whole structure together.   :D

 

Just kidding of course.  It almost looks to me like the guide for a pull cord/chain for a ceiling fan.  Does your hangar have a ceiling fan?

 

No.  You really think that's what it is...

 

It looks like a copper tube compression thumb-screw.

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I really liked all the suggestions especially the one about the master part that holds the airplane together. Seriously the one that hit home was Eric's about being the nozzle for an outdoor mister. Sure enough, I do have a mister on the hangar door that I can use when the door is open. And upon further inspection there is a cracked plastic pipe and the fitting is missing......and... the other fittings are just like it. 

Hooray the mystery is solved. Thanks Eric.

Larry 

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Yes on the living in hell, although it is not all that bad here in central Arizona.  I suppose that Bisbee is slightly warmer than here in central AZ but probably about the same as it is where Roger is in Tucson. Anyway I am glad that the "thing" has been identified.

One thing that we do have here is the chance to test the CTSW to it's limits of temperature in the summer. The hottest that I have experienced was taking off at Marana at 111 degrees at full gross an then the climb to 10,000 to get over Phoenix class B heading North. The CT does and amazing job of that among other things. Notice that I could only go to 10,000 being a light sport pilot when the cruising altitude was supposed to be 10,500! (LOL)

Larry

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Yes on the living in hell, although it is not all that bad here in central Arizona.  I suppose that Bisbee is slightly warmer than here in central AZ but probably about the same as it is where Roger is in Tucson. Anyway I am glad that the "thing" has been identified.

One thing that we do have here is the chance to test the CTSW to it's limits of temperature in the summer. The hottest that I have experienced was taking off at Marana at 111 degrees at full gross an then the climb to 10,000 to get over Phoenix class B heading North. The CT does and amazing job of that among other things. Notice that I could only go to 10,000 being a light sport pilot when the cruising altitude was supposed to be 10,500! (LOL)

Larry

We actually stay pretty cool in Bisbee at least for AZ standards being 6000' above sea level.  Hottest month is June before monsoons start so we see 1-2 days of 100deg, the rest average around 75-85, not bad.....Its a dry heat!

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Notice that I could only go to 10,000 being a light sport pilot when the cruising altitude was supposed to be 10,500! (LOL)

Larry

The odds are good that ATC has no one heading west on IFR at 10,000 over Phoenix, but I'd be nervous flying VFR at an IFR level. Away from a Class B airport, there are many GA airplanes that would like to be IFR at 10,000. It does not have to be IMC to be IFR.

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If I'm crossing terrain I will use 10,500 otherwise I descend for 8,500 when able, 10,000 when not within 3,000' of the ground has the ifr conflict.

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Well I agree with both of you and you have pointed out good operating procedures. The 8500 would be proper except that the class B goes up to 9000 so that puts the damper on 8500. Then I would not think anyone would ever admit to exceeding the 10,000  on purpose in writing since the 10,000 rule is so specific but I will let you both draw your own conclusions as to what took place. 

Thanks for the feedback, I would be interested to get some more opinions as to what others would do.

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You should fly the proper VFR altitudes except when climbing or descending or within 2000 feet of the surface. Go around the class B if this is not possible, or get a clearance to go through the class B.

Isn't that 3000 feet above the surface?

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Aren't we talking about SP rules? Limits are 10,000 ft. MSL or 2,000 AGL whichever is higher. 61.315 (11)

 

And the hemispheric rule applies to sport pilots also.   

 

Sport pilots and recreational pilots can operate in Class B, C and D with training and an instructor endorsement (FAR 61.325 & 61.101) but you need a private pilot certificate or better to operate at 12 “select” Class B airports (listed in the AIM Section 3-2-3(b)2).

 

Flying over Bravo within 500 feet of the top will get ATCs attention...you don't want to do that either unless you are ready and willing to get clearance to transition through Bravo anyway.  And as mentioned, busting Sport Pilot altitude rules would be bad witnessed by Bravo ATC.

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Aren't we talking about SP rules? Limits are 10,000 ft. MSL or 2,000 AGL whichever is higher. 61.315 (11)

My question, "Isn't that 3000 feet above the surface?," was in regards to;

"You should fly the proper VFR altitudes except when climbing or descending or within 2000 feet of the surface."

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Aren't we talking about SP rules? Limits are 10,000 ft. MSL or 2,000 AGL whichever is higher. 61.315 (11)

 

Sorry, I only glanced over things and thought we were talking about the even or odd +500 flight altitude.

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The regulation for maximum altitude for sport pilot is as posted. The rules for altitude odds/evens +500 starts at 3000 AGL.

 

Sport Pilot you wrote earlier "You should fly the proper VFR altitudes except when climbing or descending or within 2000 feet of the surface."

 

You may have meant per 61.315, but the wording also looks like it could be meant for the hemispherical rule.

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The regulation for maximum altitude for sport pilot is as posted. The rules for altitude odds/evens +500 starts at 3000 AGL.

 

Sport Pilot you wrote earlier "You should fly the proper VFR altitudes except when climbing or descending or within 2000 feet of the surface."

 

You may have meant per 61.315, but the wording also looks like it could be meant for the hemispherical rule.

 

 

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Tom how would you apply the max alt 4 sport pilot reg given the profile above, departing Tracy and Landing Mammoth?
 
At what point does the reg permit exceeding 10,000'?
 
On the reverse couarse, at what point does the reg require me to be back under 10,000'?

 

 

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Tom how would you apply the max alt 4 sport pilot reg given the profile above, departing Tracy and Landing Mammoth?

 

At what point does the reg permit exceeding 10,000'?

 

On the reverse couarse, at what point does the reg require me to be back under 10,000'?

Not having flown in conditions like you have in that part of the country, I can't honestly say how I would apply the rule. The rule says what it says, and how you apply it is up to you. I do know my number one concern would be safety first.

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I guarantee that you could make a strong case about having to deviate from the rule for safety reasons if the FAA ever went after you. Remember, you can challenge the FAA rulings and a court will preside over the case. Regulations do not trump safety, and even the regulations themselves state that deviation is allowed in the name of making it a safe flight (but they might ask for something in writing about why you deviated).

 

The issue that I do see is they could claim that you shouldn't fly that route if it requires a deviation.

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