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Flying Bozo

What is this thing??

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The bigger problem is the ceiling for most LSA.  CT knows he will need to chart a path through the mountains that will not only let him obey the rule, but still have enough power reserve to deal with mountain wave down-drafts and avoid CFIT.

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I disagree.  Why would you need to violate the FAR's in this case?  Go around the class B or get a clearance through it.

 

As I understand, CT lives in a very jagged area, and since it's high in the mountains, he has only modest WOT power.

 

If he's having to fly over mountains that are known to have turbulent ridge winds (rockies are indeed known for them), I would say that's a VERY good reason to deviate from the rule. I flew along the edge of the rockies in a Mooney, those mountains are VERY dangerous. BUT, as said, the counter point could be made that one should not even fly that route if you know you have to deviate in the first place, which stands by what you said: get clearance through the B airspace, or choose a different route.

 

By the way, if it comes up: if anyone has a private pilot or higher certificate and is acting as a sport pilot, the controlled airspace endorsement is implied, and does not require you to get one. This came from AFS 610.

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The mountains were there when the rule was written.

 

Doesn't mean that regulators thought of everything when they wrote it.

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Doesn't mean that regulators thought of everything when they wrote it.

 

Not only did they write it once, currently we have the new and improved version with the 2,000' AGL exception.  The new version is a little better but not very if you take it literally.

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If I couldn't maintain 2,000 AGL, I would not make the flight along that route.

 

The last profile was west, this one is south,  this issues exists on most routes in most directions out of here.  The Sierra is several hundred miles long and I live in the middle of it.

 

The funny part is I can maintain 2,000 AGL by soaring and maneuvering vertically along ridge lines.  I could increase my exposure in a meaningful way in order to comply with the letter, seem an odd way to address safety.

 

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Can anybody tell me what this thing is? 

 

 

 

How did you guys get from this to flying over air space?  

 

 

CTFlier.com. Where the topic of discussion means nothing and we're all out of our minds!

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You should fly the proper VFR altitudes except when climbing or descending or within 2000 feet of the surface.  Go around the class B if this is not possible, or get a clearance to go through the class B.

The VFR altitude exception for proper altitude starts at 3000 feet above the surface.

The 2000 foot exception in CFR 61.315 is for the 10,000 foot restriction placed on sport pilots. It has nothing to do with proper VFR altitude choice.

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I was responding to this question.

I knew which question you were responding to, and 2000 feet has no realivance to the question which you were responding. The regulation you used to try and back it up has nothing to with propper VFR cruising altitude.

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It has everything to do with it.  I was using the Sport Pilot limitation of 10,000 MSL unless flying within 2,000 AGL.  I said nothing about the 3,000 AGL rule.  It this case, he is limited to 10,000 MSL unless the terrain is above 8,000 MSL.  In that case he can fly higher than 10,000 MSL, but must not exceed 2,000 AGL.  He can fly any altitude within that 2,000 AGL airspace.

 

But you are correct in that he can fly any altitude in that 2,000 AGL airspace because he is within 3,000 AGL of the ground.  That, I assumed was understood.

 

I guess posting on this site, you have to backup every post with each and every FAR that could pertain.  Should I have also listed the requirements for a Sport Pilot certificate, number of dual and solo hours, etc?  This place is like an old ladies knitting club.

I was going to go back and quote your original post, but it seems to have disappeared. I guess you are trying to cover it up after the fact. I figured you made a simple mistake because I don't know of any class B airspace that has any 2000 foot AGL airspace that is above 10,000 MSL .

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Well, just to add to the brouhaha...

 

1) I also read your original post as mistakenly implying the hemispheric rule began at 2,000' AGL, and I would have pointed out the error had others not done so.

 

2) Deleting posts continues to be bad form. Especially if a topic is still active.

 

3) When a post of mine is misunderstood, I usually analyze to what extent the fault is mine and reword my thought, usually with an apology for not being clearer. Happens all the time, and works pretty well!

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2) Deleting posts continues to be bad form. Especially if a topic is still active.

Deleting one's own posts is often counterproductive, as others may have quoted it in their responses. Now all that remains is their edited quote, which may be even less favorable to one's self than the now expunged original.

 

Thread drift does have it's own life, but can one split a thread or can only an admin type do that? Let's see, this would be at least the third life of this thread and I've started two of them. :)

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Well, just to add to the brouhaha...

 

1) I also read your original post as mistakenly implying the hemispheric rule began at 2,000' AGL, and I would have pointed out the error had others not done so.

 

2) Deleting posts continues to be bad form. Especially if a topic is still active.

 

3) When a post of mine is misunderstood, I usually analyze to what extent the fault is mine and reword my thought, usually with an apology for not being clearer. Happens all the time, and works pretty well!

 

Nice speech Eddie...laughing...your buddy from the SportPilot site is gonna have it rougher over here because the guys on this board actually KNOW what they are talking about...

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Why the adversarial attitude?  Maybe you don't understand the point I was trying to make.  I have explained it twice, but don't want to continue to argue with you.  For the third time, I was making the point that he needed to follow the east/west rule and could not fly above 10,000 feet unless the terrain forced him higher.  In that case, he must remain within 2,000 AGL.  That's 61.315( c )(11).

 

And if there is no class B such as that (I have no idea), it's even easier.  He cannot fly above 10,000 feet.

I understood the point you were trying to make after you explained it the first time. The point you were trying to make doesn't negate the fact that the way you worded the statement made it incorrect. I was not the only one who took your statement to be incorrect or question the 2000 foot figure in this thread. When I made a post trying to clear things up I thought I was correcting a simple typing error on your part. I didn't think my post which is now post #22 where I was trying to correct the simple mistake was adversarial, but you responded to it in a negative manor. You singled me out of all the other posters who questioned the mistake, and that is why I took what you consider an adversarial position after that point.

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