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Stacy

It was hard to keep the engine warm today

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It was 4 degrees, when I started the plane today. It took a while for it to get to 124. On climb out the temp started dropping fast. I put flaps at 30 and reduced power. Temp started rising slowing but would not reach 124 until I went flaps 40. In level flight, I had to keep it at 45 knots to keep it warm. After an hour and a half of local flying we landed with the temp going down to 105 on final.

 

The Cherokee that I use to have, had plates that attached on the front of the engine to keep it warm in the winter. Is there something that I need to install, to keep the engine at operating temp.

 

Thanks in advance !

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Foil tape will do the trick. There is even an approval from the manufacture. At least a 2" wide strip all the way across the top of the radiator as a starting point, and you might have to add a little more in the real cold temps like you had today.

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My CFI guy called and finally next week I will have a window of temps in the 30's instead of the zeros of the last 6 weeks! We still love Montana but don't come here it's scary!

 

Anyway he and I will be heading out for my flight review and currency so I can finally pilot my new ride and enjoy her.

 

Question: If I can't gather 120 degrees after run up can I go ahead and take off? I remember somewhere here reading Roger saying he never reached 120 one day and took off close to that number. I'm not sure how shy of 120 Roger said he started out but that's not important! Roger is a expert with this engine.

 

I'm thinking my very strick CFI who has perused the the POH may not want to venture forward unless we're in the POH numbers. My CFI and myself will be the blind leading the blind.

 

Yes I ran one strip of foil on the oil cooler.

 

Thanks for input!

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Not the question you asked, and you know this, but study up on part 91 and airspace, etc.  Also, make sure you are familiar with Sport Pilot privileges and limitations if you don't have a medical.

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Yes I am learning a lot about the new world of vfr flying since I was last active. We didn't have class a, b, c etc airports in the 80's. Pretty easy stuff tho and really having fun twisting my old brain on this stuff.

 

The new world of glass cockpits which mine has and gps nav and auto pilot has makes my old teaching of pilotage kind of antiquated! I will always know where I'm at my pilotage along the way!

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remember somewhere here reading Roger saying he never reached 120 one day and took off close to that number. I'm not sure how shy of 120 Roger said he started out but that's not important! Roger is a expert with this engine.

 

I'm thinking my very strick CFI who has perused the the POH may not want to venture forward unless we're in the POH numbers. My CFI and myself will be the blind leading the blind.

 

 

Operating the engine below normal operation temps will result in shorter engine life and premature damage.  You should never take off below temp.  Rotax is the ONLY authority on this.  You should always follow the Rotax manual.  It sounds like a smart CFI.  Be mindful, word of mouth is not a replacement for what the designers state.  After all, they have engineering degrees. 

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Yes I am learning a lot about the new world of vfr flying since I was last active. We didn't have class a, b, c etc airports in the 80's. Pretty easy stuff tho and really having fun twisting my old brain on this stuff.

 

The new world of glass cockpits which mine has and gps nav and auto pilot has makes my old teaching of pilotage kind of antiquated! I will always know where I'm at my pilotage along the way!

 

The main difference between Sport Pilot and Private is you cannot fly at night, or in IMC, fly over 10,000 feet msl, fly into controlled airspace without a radio endorsement (this may affect you since as you say you did not have controlled airspace experience when you last flew), and fly faster than 87kts without a higher speed endorsement (this probably doesnt affect you).  And of course you must fly an LSA.

 

Always follow the restrictions and guidance in the POH and other manufacturers guides (intercom, BRS, engine, xpndr, PFD/MFD, Garmin etc).  At least then you can't blame youself when something breaks or goes wrong.   You will still fly mostly pilotage around the patch.  Most of the time you wont enter a flight plan into your Garmin (if you have one) or use the autopilot (if you have one).

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The main difference between Sport Pilot and Private is you cannot fly at night, fly over 10,000 feet agl, fly into controlled airspace without a radio endorsement (this may affect you since as you say you did not have controlled airspace experience when you last flew), and fly faster than 75kts without a higher speed endorsement (this probably doesnt affect you).  And of course you must fly an LSA.

 

Always follow the restrictions and guidance in the POH and other manufacturers guides (intercom, BRS, engine, xpndr, PFD/MFD, Garmin etc).  At least then you can't blame youself when something breaks or goes wrong.   You will still fly mostly pilotage around the patch.  Most of the time you wont enter a flight plan into your Garmin (if you have one) or use the autopilot (if you have one).

 

While what you said is true for the most part for a sport pilot (its <> 87kts for the speed endorsements), it doesn't apply to him. He is a commercial pilot operating under sport pilot limitations. Any pilot holding a rating higher than sport pilot operating under sport pilot privileges does not need airspace or speed endorsements.

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The main difference between Sport Pilot and Private is you cannot fly at night, or in IMC, fly over 10,000 feet agl, fly into controlled airspace without a radio endorsement (this may affect you since as you say you did not have controlled airspace experience when you last flew), and fly faster than 75kts without a higher speed endorsement (this probably doesnt affect you).  And of course you must fly an LSA.

 

Always follow the restrictions and guidance in the POH and other manufacturers guides (intercom, BRS, engine, xpndr, PFD/MFD, Garmin etc).  At least then you can't blame youself when something breaks or goes wrong.   You will still fly mostly pilotage around the patch.  Most of the time you wont enter a flight plan into your Garmin (if you have one) or use the autopilot (if you have one).

 

Actually, doesn't have to fly a LSA. Just has to be an aircraft meeting LSA parameters.

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Yes I am learning a lot about the new world of vfr flying since I was last active. We didn't have class a, b, c etc airports in the 80's. Pretty easy stuff tho and really having fun twisting my old brain on this stuff.

 

The new world of glass cockpits which mine has and gps nav and auto pilot has makes my old teaching of pilotage kind of antiquated! I will always know where I'm at my pilotage along the way!

 

You had A, B, C, and D, it was just called something different.  You will find flying much easier now than in the 80's with the advent of GPS.

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The main difference between Sport Pilot and Private is you cannot fly at night, or in IMC, fly over 10,000 feet agl, fly into controlled airspace without a radio endorsement (this may affect you since as you say you did not have controlled airspace experience when you last flew), and fly faster than 75kts without a higher speed endorsement (this probably doesnt affect you). And of course you must fly an LSA.

 

Always follow the restrictions and guidance in the POH and other manufacturers guides (intercom, BRS, engine, xpndr, PFD/MFD, Garmin etc). At least then you can't blame youself when something breaks or goes wrong. You will still fly mostly pilotage around the patch. Most of the time you wont enter a flight plan into your Garmin (if you have one) or use the autopilot (if you have one).

10,000 ft. or 2,000 agl whichever is higher.

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The main difference between Sport Pilot and Private is you cannot fly at night, or in IMC, fly over 10,000 feet agl,

 

And it's 10,000 MSL, not agl.  It's 10,000 MSL or 2,000 agl, whichever is higher.

 

"PRIVILEGES & LIMITATIONS

When operating as a sport pilot, you as the pilot must operate within the following guidelines of the sport pilot certificate:

Privileges

The holder of a valid sport pilot certificate may:

  • Operate as pilot in command of a sport pilot eligible aircraft.
  • Carry a single passenger and share expenses (fuel, oil, airport expenses, and aircraft rental).
  • Fly during the daytime using visual flight rules (VFR). Three statute miles visibility and visual contact with the ground are required.
  • Fly Cross-country anywhere in the U.S.
  • Fly up to 10,000 feet above mean sea level (MSL) or 2,000 feet above ground level (AGL), whichever is higher.
  • Fly in Class E and G airspace (and B, C, and D airspace with appropriate training).

Limitations

Sport pilots may not:

  • Fly in Class A airspace.
  • Fly in Class B, C, or D airspace until they receive training and a logbook endorsement from an instructor.
  • Fly outside the U.S. without prior permission from the foreign aviation authority.
  • Tow any object.
  • Fly while carrying a passenger or property for compensation or hire.
  • Fly in furtherance of a business."

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Actually, doesn't have to fly a LSA. Just has to be an aircraft meeting LSA parameters.

The FAA considers anything that meets the CFR1.1 definition of a Light Sport to be a light sport, regardless of how it received its airworthiness certificate.

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Not really.  You can buy an old J3, Taylorcraft, Luscombe, Champ, or Ercoupe for a lot less than most LSA.  If we're going to post here, we might as well try to be accurate.

I think the aircraft you mentioned based on numbers in service woul be most LSA.

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Yea, I've seen this discussion before.  I prefer this since those aircraft were certified and built before LSA existed.  But, I guess if someone at the FAA wants to call them LSA, then maybe they are.

 

  • Operate as pilot in command of a sport pilot eligible aircraft.
  • Aircraft with a standard airworthiness certificate that meet above specifications may be flown by sport pilots. However, the aircraft must remain in standard category and cannot be changed to light sport aircraft category.

 

Personally, it think it is incorrect to call a standard category aircraft a light sport aircraft.  It is more correctly a standard category aircraft that falls within the light sport design and performance parameters.  If it was a light sport, why can't it be maintained as a light sport?  Because it's not a light sport.

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Not really.  You can buy an old J3, Taylorcraft, Luscombe, Champ, or Ercoupe for a lot less than most LSA.  If we're going to post here, we might as well try to be accurate.

Yes, although you have to be careful because some models were produced with larger engines and would not fit Light Sport rules. You also cannot work on a standard certificates plane as an LSRM-A.

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Yea, I've seen this discussion before.  I prefer this since those aircraft were certified and built before LSA existed.  But, I guess if someone at the FAA wants to call them LSA, then maybe they are.

 

  • Operate as pilot in command of a sport pilot eligible aircraft.
  • Aircraft with a standard airworthiness certificate that meet above specifications may be flown by sport pilots. However, the aircraft must remain in standard category and cannot be changed to light sport aircraft category.

 

Personally, it think it is incorrect to call a standard category aircraft a light sport aircraft.  It is more correctly a standard category aircraft that falls within the light sport design and performance parameters.  If it was a light sport, why can't it be maintained as a light sport?  Because it's not a light sport.

 

 LSA is just a definition of airplane, not unlike High Performance. Both terms were coined by the FAA after airplanes had already been built. If you use the same logic airplanes built prior to the term high performance being used by the FAA should not be considered high performance?

 

No place in the regulations does the FAA grant a sport pilot privileges to fly anything other than a light sport aircraft. The FAA does not speak of or its equivalent. If you really dig into the regulations pertaining to light sport aircraft as well as sport pilots, it becomes clear that standard category aircraft that meet the requirements of CFR 1.1 definition are Light Sport Aircraft.

 

Airplane have and always will be maintained based on how they receive their airworthiness certificate.

 

In my mind the attempts of the EAA and AOPA to simplify the new rule in their explanations to the population has created a big misunderstanding of what the rules really mean. This topic is a big example of that. In addition to many people look to the EAA and AOPA as the final authority on the subject, when it really is the FAA and regulations that they need to be looking at.

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You're using LSA as a generic term.  Many of us use LSA to mean aircraft built and certified as LSA.

 

I'm not saying one is right and one is wrong.  It's two different uses of the term to refer to two different universes of aircraft.

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LSA is a term to describe an aircraft the meets the definition of CFR 1.1. Any aircraft that meet the definition is a LSA, regardless of how it is certified.

SLSA and ELSA are covered in CFR part 21.190 and 21.191. These are 2 ways an airworthiness certificate can be issued to a LSA, but these are not the only way a LSA can be certified.

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Tom, this may be semantics, but is there a distinction between saying an aircraft is certificated Special Light Sport (for instance) and saying it can be flown under light sport rules? I know it makes a big difference when you talk about who can do work beyond maintenance.

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Doug, only light sport aircraft can be flown under light sport rules, it makes no difference how their airworthiness certificates are issued.

For maintenance the FAA determines who can work on aircraft based on the type of airworthiness certificate that has been issued to it. Take a look at the privileges of your LSRM, and it specifically gives you the privilege of working on a airplane with an airworthiness certificate issued in the light sport category, instead of saying you can work on a light sport aircraft. This is another example of the FAA distinguishing between a light sport aircraft and one with an airworthiness certificate issued in the light sport category.

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