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bmar

Tow bar for moving plane?

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Soon to be owner of a CTLS. How do you move the plane or back it into the hangar? If it has towbar pins what tow bar do I order? Or should I push it back holding the base of the prop?

 

Thanks!

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As mentioned above you push down on the tail to turn it and push back on the tail to roll it.

 

That said you can use a tow bar for steering. I have put 3-4 setups on the front axle with longer bolts that a tow bar will fit. It's really quite easy. It is not meant for heavy pushing and pulling, but light stuff works just fine.

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I gotta say, my favorite part of the preflight is pulling the plane out of the hangar (holding the base of the prop) and turning it 90deg by lightly pushing down on the tail and walking her around.  In my short time flying I've given flights to several passengers and each one bursts out giggling when seeing the routine.  The joys of a featherweight plane...

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I have been pushing on the wing root, the left side, facing the tail,

works well, but using the other side gives odd results, the nosegear

Twists somewhat, do not know why.

Also, am back to Incline parking, and stopping the roll forward after

backing the CT in, can be tricky. You need a plan, chock the nose, or

Grab the horse collar and attach to tie down line/chain, or maybe go from the

Tailboom to the cockpit to set the brake.

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The towbar idea is better suited for steering more than a full push/pull setup. You can use the towbar to steer and push or pull at the base of the prop at the hub.

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I have always been a guy that moved the plane manually as many have described here.  Lately, I pull the plane out of the hangar manually but started using a tow bar (Aircraft Spruce) to put it back in, and have to say - its easier to maneuver and steer into position in my hangar (which has a slight uphill grade to back into).   I guess what that means is - you don't need a tow bar, but tow bars work just fine and in some cases make it easier for you depending on your parking situation, age and physical limitations.

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My solution to towing .............        Just kidding.  Bored due to delay and saw that towbar lying around.  Just had to do the pic.

78827061_2475084272811211_8061242246919356416_n.jpg

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I should comment that I acknowledge that the above post is a joke, but I do need to point something out.

Do not ever let anyone tow a CT using a motorized tug on the nosewheel. Only a few CT models were made with nosewheel towbar mounts and they were custom ordered, with only a hand towbar in mind.

If a motorized tug must be used, it must be towed by the mains with wheels on dollies.

The nosewheel and firewall mounting is not designed to take the twisting moments created by towing.

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A motorized tug is significantly more stressful than hand movement.

Consider the oomph it takes to get an airplane moving by hand, vs how easy a tug gets going. Consider the shock difference to structure.

Design consideration = weight.

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I’ve been using this for about 2 years. It’s got a remote with three speeds. I use the “tortoise “ speed for towing. All of my towing is straight out/in with very slight course corrections. Speed control is very precise with smooth starts/stops. My ramp is level. 
So far no problems. As Corey says it could cause damage with abrupt starts/stops or trying to turn beyond gear limits. 
I would not want to turn this loose at a flight school or club. I’m the only user. If I screw it up then so be it!!👿

AFB97153-843A-472B-A67E-5E7D54807C89.jpeg

Edited by sandpiper
spelling

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I bought the standard (Cessna I think) tow bar from Spruce... worked well for a long time, until I watched the FD Woodstock guys move their planes around... they never use tow bars, they lean on the tail, lift up the front wheel and push and pull easily and it is actually an elegant way to move the plane.  Whenever I go to lunch with the guys at my home field group (Cessna's, Bonanza, Arrow, a Navion, blah), I turn the engine off, lift the door, move to the tail, push with my body weight and move the plane into the hangar within seconds... My door is closed by the time they start their gasoline tow motors... a check in the glad I have an LSA column !

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6 hours ago, Jacques said:

Frankenstein bolts.....???

image.jpeg.e521796a2a9ec40cf131effd6858ffff.jpeg
 

Bolts on the nose gear that allow a tow bar to be connected. Look very similar to “Frankenstein”. An option available for install on CTs.

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There is a threaded receptacle in the nose strut that they screw into. The CTLS added them in 2010 or 12. I’m not sure if they can be added to an existing fork, or if the fork must be replaced.

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