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Flight Design KLA-100

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This looks like a nice plane and will hurt Vans RV12. It's a better cabin setup all around. It's lighter, set up for taller people and wider cabin, better instrumentation and controls. FD and Vessel did a good job and I'm not even a low wing fan.

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Flight Design Updates Journalists; Introduces KLA-100

BY ROY BEISSWENGER || APRIL 7, 2017

 

People here at Sun 'n Fun have been asking questions about Flight Design as the company has no exhibitor presence. However, the popular CTLS can be seen at the AeroJones Americas space. Why is this the case? Reporter (and publisher of Powered Sport Flying magazine), on duty at Aero provided the following report. —DJ

 

At the press conference for Flight Design president Matthias Betsch began the presentation explaining the company’s current situation. As many who follow the industry know, Flight Design has had their share of financial problems. The company is operating more or less as usual, but is in court-ordered receivership. That means many decisions the company makes need to be approved by the receiver. Fortunately, the situation is reportedly more stable than some speculate.

 

Official and creditors want the business to remain viable by producing, selling, and supporting primary products. However, projects in development may not always survive scrutiny. Flight Designs’ four-seat C4 project has been put on hold.

 

That is what makes the introduction of the KLA-100 that much more interesting. This low wing airplane is being shown here at the Flight Design booth right along with the more familiar CT design. Flight Design USA president Tom Peghiny (photo) explained the project.

 

The KLA-100 is a cooperative venture with a company called Vessel Co. Ltd. of South Korea. The government of that country is funding part of the project in order to learn more about the certification process. The project is jointly engineered resulting in construction of two prototypes. One is in Germany and seen at Aero; the other is in South Korea. Two more prototypes are scheduled to be built this year in anticipation of getting the product to market by the end of 2017.

 

Tom is acting as Head of Flight Test within the Flight Design organization, a position that carries authority from the German government. For those familiar with FAA designees like Designated Airworthiness Representatives, it is a similar situation, the difference being that companies get the designation instead of individuals. Still, audits and interviews are involved before someone can fill the official position. Tom has long experience. In addition to many years in the aircraft building business, he was the first chairman of the key ASTM Design and Performance Committee that wrote the standards used by all Special LSA producers.

 

Tom went over some of the design features of the all-carbon-fiber airplane. In particular, the wing is a high aspect ratio airfoil (8.8:1) with a significant laminar flow, NASA-inspired Stall-Safe leading edge on the outer wings for spin resistance, and unique blended winglets to improve climb and cruise.

 

The cabin is spacious and features a Garmin avionics suite. It is built around dual Garmin G3X EFIS and EMS screens combined with a Garmin GTN-650 MFD, Garmin GTX-335 Mode ES ADS-B out transponder and optional Garmin 2 axis autopilot.

 

The aircraft you see in the images has already flown seven flights and is doing well in testing. The price is forecast to be around $160,000.

 

Specifications & Performance

 

Powerplant — 74 KW (100 HP) fuel inject- ed Rotax 912iS

Wingspan — 10.311 m (33’9”)

Wheelbase — 54inches (1.37 m)

Wing Area — 129 square feet (12 sq m)

Cockpit width— 49 inches (124 cm)

Fuel— 34 gallons (130 l)

Cruise Speed — 132 knots (245 km/h)

Stall Speed @ gross, best flaps — 39 knots (72 km/h)

Range at Cruise Speed — 722 nautical miles (1,337km)

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It looks like this aircraft has been around a while, mostly on paper.  Google searches show academic design studies going back years, then the Government getting involved, pushing things forward to the point where they have actually ordered a significant run of the aircraft to be used for training and development of a General Aviation market in S.Korea.  I'm interested in the flight characteristics, as it looks like a lot of modern design has gone into the wings and flaps.  I notice what looks like discontinuous leading edges on the wings, like a Cirrus? 

KakaoTalk_20161130_221821405.jpg

KLA+100-1.jpg

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I can't believe with a 33' wingspan it only has a 8.8:1 ratio since the CT is published at 14:1. Just the shape and cord length I guess.

 

The 8.8:1 figure is aspect ratio, not glide ratio. If that number is correct with a span of 33 feet it would have an average cord of 3.75 feet.

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I know there is conflation of glide ratio and wing aspect ratio here, but as a matter of information here is the CTLS glide ratio from POH -

 

"Glide angle of the CTLS-LSA can be assumed in practice to be 8.5 to 1 with flaps 0°, and 7.9 to 1 with flaps -6°."

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This looks like a nice plane and will hurt Vans RV12. It's a better cabin setup all around. It's lighter, set up for taller people and wider cabin, better instrumentation and controls. FD and Vessel did a good job and I'm not even a low wing fan.

 

And a better fuel tank design/location...    :ph34r:

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When I see the CT being published at 14:1, I tend to call BS. I really should check it someday.

 

My informal testing shows something like 10:1 or 11:1.  But 14:1 is dreaming.  Maybe if you took the landing gear completely off.  :)

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Interesting... It looks like the KLA-100 has a big brother.... the KC-100, another aircraft that S.Korea has been developing to feel-out the GA market.  The KC-100 has been winding it's way through development and certification for several years, however Flight Design is not involved.  It's a 4-place Cirrus look-a-like, that will have a military trainer version, as well as a GA version.  Just like the KLA-100, the government is behind the project and has already ordered a bunch of the airplanes. It takes time, but it looks like actual, flying, planes are about to come out of the pipeline.

Info on the military trainer:  http://defence-blog.com/news/korea-air-force-has-been-put-into-service-a-new-kt-100-training-aircraft.html

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Actually let's hope Stratos isn't used. It's a European company. remember what maint. or getting Neuform prop blades and inspections were like.

If you need a Startos repack or have any issue they are overseas vs BRS here in the US. 

 

The Stratos may be a fine chute, but may offer some logistic issues if maint. is needed.

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Gotta agree on the "from Europe" aspect, but it looks like they are doing a brisk business, and I found this:

" Normal parachute inspection and repack cost is only $500, and includes rocket inspection and return to service at no additional cost.  Rocket service life is indefinite, and only requires replacement when inspection warrants.  Repacking charges for deployed parachutes are based on condition of chute, lines, housing, etc., and determined on an individual basis."

 

Elsewhere, there was info on shipping... I think the whole things ships worldwide Fed-X for $200

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Look out Vans RV12

Concur.

If the price is competitive with the RV-12 S-LSA, there are going to a lot of RV-12 customers looking closely at this airplane.

It will be interesting to see how this pans out.

It's a good looking airplane, yeah?

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It looks like they've borrowed design pieces from some of the best, and added some new stuff that is exciting.  The wing design, with attention to modern concepts like laminar flow, the winglets, and flap design may make some difference when it comes to performance and safety.  I like the rear windows, yet they left a great spot for the parachute.   I'm glad there are foot lockers, and I'm hoping for a decent baggage area.  

 

But, they always look good on paper and setting on a nice grass field.  Eventually it must perform well, and have realistic capacities.  #fingerscrossed

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