Jump to content
Buckaroo

CTSW owner wants to spend some money!!

Recommended Posts

Just like my truck and Harley I like to add cool stuff to my ride! I'll admit I'm a perfectionist that likes the best stuff for my rides,guns etc!

 

Question? What must have, cool, smart etc stuff do members recommend for our CT's? I really like the led landing light. I like my Tanis heater.

 

What other things are cool??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a trailer mounted fueling station with grounding and bounding cables.  Recently I mounted a 40gal transfer tank in my pickup truck. I can fuel while standing on my tailgate.  So convenient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have ADS-B in/out?  Highly recommended if one flies in a busy area.  Perhaps not needed for flying in Montana but the old saying "big sky, small plane" is debunked after getting this installed in my CT.  There's a LOT of aircraft out there that one doesn't see!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing I added was ADS-B in/out. If you haven't already done it, that might be a logical next step, especially if you plan to travel much in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have ADS-B in/out?  Highly recommended if one flies in a busy area.  Perhaps not needed for flying in Montana but the old saying "big sky, small plane" is debunked after getting this installed in my CT.  There's a LOT of aircraft out there that one doesn't see!

Apparently, great minds think alike, and at the same time, too! I agree with Dick - I usually get flight following when traveling, and many times I don't see traffic even when ATC points it out. Once in a while (not often) they'll have me looking in the wrong direction. Having that information in the cockpit, real time, makes a big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing I added was ADS-B in/out. If you haven't already done it, that might be a logical next step, especially if you plan to travel much in it.

Mr Runtoeat and John thanks! I've kinda been holding out on those until the 2020 mandatory reg hoping they get better and cheaper.

 

How much is a good unit and how difficult is the install?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr Runtoeat and John thanks! I've kinda been holding out on those until the 2020 mandatory reg hoping they get better and cheaper.

How much is a good unit and how difficult is the install?

I went with the Garmin 345. It actually reduced the empty weight a tad, and is a relatively easy installation. It's not quite the slide-out/slide-in procedure that you might expect, though. After the FAA rebate, a "Garmin Bucks" coupon, and re-sale of the original transponder it ran to about $4800 installed. There are less expensive options out there, including the one Dick (runtoeat) installed and the new "BOM" linked above. Note that if you're going to install a WAAS antenna externally, FD can provide a drawing showing how to install it on the cabin roof, left side near the flap root. They didn't charge anything for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went with the Garmin 345. It actually reduced the empty weight a tad, and is a relatively easy installation. It's not quite the slide-out/slide-in procedure that you might expect, though. After the FAA rebate, a "Garmin Bucks" coupon, and re-sale of the original transponder it ran to about $4800 installed. There are less expensive options out there, including the one Dick (runtoeat) installed and the new "BOM" linked above. Note that if you're going to install a WAAS antenna externally, FD can provide a drawing showing how to install it on the cabin roof, left side near the flap root. They didn't charge anything for that.

I went with the Dynon system for about half that. I have not sold my GTX330 yet. I also upgraded to the direct replacement TruTrak Vizion. Now my transponder and autopilot are controlled on my Skyview screen.

I have not had any expertwith it yet as I just finished the install and still need to have my transponder tested before I am airworthy. The MRA was only $40.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went with the Dynon system for about half that. I have not sold my GTX330 yet. I also upgraded to the direct replacement TruTrak Vizion. Now my transponder and autopilot are controlled on my Skyview screen.

I have not had any expertwith it yet as I just finished the install and still need to have my transponder tested before I am airworthy. The MRA was only $40.

Looking forward to your performance report forthcoming.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went with the Garmin 345. It actually reduced the empty weight a tad, and is a relatively easy installation. It's not quite the slide-out/slide-in procedure that you might expect, though. After the FAA rebate, a "Garmin Bucks" coupon, and re-sale of the original transponder it ran to about $4800 installed. There are less expensive options out there, including the one Dick (runtoeat) installed and the new "BOM" linked above. Note that if you're going to install a WAAS antenna externally, FD can provide a drawing showing how to install it on the cabin roof, left side near the flap root. They didn't charge anything for that.

 

John, I am planning on replacing my GTX 327 and 496 with a GTX 345 and Aera 660 combo some time in the next 9-18 months.  ACS currently has a deal of the two together for $5300 for experimental airplanes (I'm E-LSA), which seems like a great deal.  You are the first CT owner with a 345 that I know of.  As I research and move forward I'd love to pick your brain on how you like the unit and the install.  

 

Are you using Garmin Pilot as a display for weather and traffic?  Also, did you install a physical "anonymous mode" switch?  I know that is an option in the wiring diagram, and I really like that idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckaroo, did you decide yet if you will go E-LSA?

No I'm waiting for the local Rotax guru to get back from snow birding. He ran a full Rans build operation here inTownsend (bueno aviation) and installed many Rotax. He argues that I go that way.

 

Arian from FD says I'll lose up to 30% value on my plane going Experimental.

 

I'm at a loss right now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had several people with lots of experience tell me that there will be no loss of value, only a somewhat smaller group of potential buyers.  Just last month the DAR that run the "Ask a DAR" column at Kitplanes said in print he doesn't not thing think there would be any loss of value.  

 

But even if you do lose some value at sale time, consider all the maintenance you will save on in the meantime.  Pay now or pay later, there are no cheap airplanes!  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had several people with lots of experience tell me that there will be no loss of value, only a somewhat smaller group of potential buyers. Just last month the DAR that run the "Ask a DAR" column at Kitplanes said in print he doesn't not thing think there would be any loss of value.

 

But even if you do lose some value at sale time, consider all the maintenance you will save on in the meantime. Pay now or pay later, there are no cheap airplanes! :)

Yes I'm going to really consider this as around these parts it do-it-yourself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I'm going to really consider this as around these parts it do-it-yourself!

Experimental or not I would strongly suggest that you take the time to get your LSRM-A and some Rotax training. It makes the work legal on your LSA and gives you a good understanding of any work you might do on an E-LSA.

(There are many "little" things, like how to do an oil change and inspect the filter for metal, or how to know if you have the right bolt - not just one that fits, that are not as simple as they may seem.)

I "do it myself" mainly because I get concerned about A&Ps who don't know anything about carbon fiber or Rotax dealing with my plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experimental or not I would strongly suggest that you take the time to get your LSRM-A and some Rotax training. It makes the work legal on your LSA and gives you a good understanding of any work you might do on an E-LSA.

(There are many "little" things, like how to do an oil change and inspect the filter for metal, or how to know if you have the right bolt - not just one that fits, that are not as simple as they may seem.)

I "do it myself" mainly because I get concerned about A&Ps who don't know anything about carbon fiber or Rotax dealing with my plane.

I agree 100% Doug! Since joining this forum I've read and learned so many things exclusive to the Rotax engine. I've learned about vibration problems from unbalanced carbs, hoses poorly clamped, fuel contamination from squeezing hoses improperly, using the wrong clamps, air in oil lines, using the wrong oil and filters etc. etc.

 

My hose replacement is due as well as my annual. My plan later this month is to fly down to Rocky Mountain Kit planes in Salt Lake and get works! I need to call them and order the parts ahead of time.

 

My goal during this visit is to stand there quietly observing the work. I hope they let me!

 

I do plan to take a few classes as I realize this isn't working on my Harley although the bing carbs are like the ones on my old BMW!????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experimental or not I would strongly suggest that you take the time to get your LSRM-A and some Rotax training. It makes the work legal on your LSA and gives you a good understanding of any work you might do on an E-LSA.

(There are many "little" things, like how to do an oil change and inspect the filter for metal, or how to know if you have the right bolt - not just one that fits, that are not as simple as they may seem.)

I "do it myself" mainly because I get concerned about A&Ps who don't know anything about carbon fiber or Rotax dealing with my plane.

 

I agree, I'm taking the LSRM Inspection course in two weeks.  It's good to have that for doing some maintenance tasks, and a requirement for doing your own condition inspections on an E-LSA that you own.

 

I agree about A&Ps, most don't know Rotax and CT issues.  However, another good alternative that I practiced before I went to E-LSA is to find a good A&P who will work with you, let you do most of the work under supervision, and then inspect and sign off on the work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×