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29 minutes ago, JohnnyBlackCT said:

If I'm going to crash, I want to do it as slowly as possible.  If I'm going to land, I want to do it at the proper speed and flap configuration for the conditions.  There are some crosswind and turbulence conditions that less than full flaps and higher landing speed is not only advisable but absolutely necessary.  An airplane can and will run out of control authority under certain conditions.  To argue that every landing should be full flaps and as slow as possible is naive and poor piloting technique.  On the other hand, it is also poor piloting technique to land with too little flaps at higher than necessary airspeed.  As experienced pilots, we should be able to ascertain the conditions and set up our approach and landing accordingly.  If not, you need more dual.

I think that is a very good post.  

Personally if a higher speed landing is required I consider going elsewhere or coming back later.  I realize that when making that higher speed landing the risk of losing control to shear on roll out is high due to the fact that I have flying speed and the wrong gust can have its way with me and I have no way to counter that till I slow down.

 

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ct9000   

I am in the full flap camp because that allows you to carry more power all the way to the ground and so have very good rudder authority, but that's not why I am sticking my oar in here. Turbines take quite a while to spool up and it is unsafe to have no power available. eg - a go around is virtually impossible. Different situation to our aircraft where power is more or less instantly available and a CT is quite happy to go around with full flap unlike a lot of GA types. Try it in a C150 with full flap and it will not get off the ground. A CT will leap into the air the moment you open the throttle ( and will need a bit of elevator control ). 

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WmInce   
23 hours ago, FlyingMonkey said:

Crosswind gusts required exaggerated control inputs, and the shifting wind meant running the stick almost to the stops in all directions.  Also the airplane abruptly quit flying when the wind shifted at a foot above the runway, leading to a “drop in” landing that would have been reduced or eliminated with 15 flaps and a little more speed.

it was quite a ride.

Been there . . . done that.

It has been my experience . . that is exactly what can happen. Those conditions require one to be on their toes.

That withstanding, the CTSW is a great little airplane. I enjoy flying it emmensely.

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WmInce   
1 hour ago, JohnnyBlackCT said:

If I'm going to crash, I want to do it as slowly as possible.  If I'm going to land, I want to do it at the proper speed and flap configuration for the conditions.  There are some crosswind and turbulence conditions that less than full flaps and higher landing speed is not only advisable but absolutely necessary.  An airplane can and will run out of control authority under certain conditions.  To argue that every landing should be full flaps and as slow as possible is naive and poor piloting technique.  On the other hand, it is also poor piloting technique to land with too little flaps at higher than necessary airspeed.  As experienced pilots, we should be able to ascertain the conditions and set up our approach and landing accordingly.  If not, you need more dual.

Best post of the whole thread. :clap-3332::thumbs_up-3334:

Concur totally.

  • Upvote 1

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And one thing I think at least one poster here is forgetting...higher landing speeds with less flaps also means the airplane has a higher stalling speed, also due to the lesser flaps.  Therefore, it's not some huge risk unless you get crazy TOO fast.  I'm still recommending a full stall landing such that when you land the airplane is done flying.  It's not going to zoom back up into the air due to a burst of wind, at least no more than a full stall landing at slower speed with more flaps.  To me, the biggest risk is trying to plant the airplane on the runway at a speed that exceeds stall speed at whatever flap setting you are using.  This can result in all kinds of unintended consequences, none of them good.

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51 minutes ago, JohnnyBlackCT said:

And one thing I think at least one poster here is forgetting...higher landing speeds with less flaps also means the airplane has a higher stalling speed, also due to the lesser flaps.  Therefore, it's not some huge risk unless you get crazy TOO fast.  I'm still recommending a full stall landing such that when you land the airplane is done flying.  It's not going to zoom back up into the air due to a burst of wind, at least no more than a full stall landing at slower speed with more flaps.  To me, the biggest risk is trying to plant the airplane on the runway at a speed that exceeds stall speed at whatever flap setting you are using.  This can result in all kinds of unintended consequences, none of them good.

Yes!  My touchdown speed at 15 flaps is 2-3kt faster than at 30.  

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Buckaroo   
9 hours ago, ausctls said:
  •  

What happened to your post? 

I liked that “flap as required” 

Thats why mine are usually set at zero for my 4000 foot runway and doing touch and goes. My touch downs are always full stall nose high and my taxi roll after touch down I usually taxi with throttle enough to keep the nose wheel high and off the ground. Why? Gives a touch of more practice. Never on gusty days tho!

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