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Ed Cesnalis

30° flaperon landings - can be fun - or not

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@JLang said:

Some CT pilots find that control authority decreases with increased flaps.

Some CT pilots find the opposite.

 

The difference is a choice of energy source that you use to load your flaperons. 

A CTSW can run out of energy very rapidly and as Roger points out it results in bent gear :( It happens with 30° of flaperons because that is an extremely dirty configuration, with 30° loss of energy can be rapid and problematic. Roger is a bit of a speed guy now and its true that extra energy protects from rapid and problematic energy loss but at a price.

Our options for loading our flaperons are:

  1. Throttle
  2. Pitch attitude

To benefit from your 30° flaperon approach and landing :)  you want to keep your flaperons loaded all the way to contact with the runway.

Conversely, to realize diminished control from  your 30° flaperon use just unload them (its easy to do).  When you unload them you loose the buoyant feeling and wings want to drop or the plane wants to stop flying or drift takes a lot of input to control. :(

To get a bad result just fly the approach similarly to an approach with 15° and there will be points in your approach / landing where the flaps unload.

With practice you can do any kind of approach you want and keep your flaperons loaded but until that becomes 2nd nature here is an approach/landing method that I generally use for consistency and ease. 

The idea is to load the flaps early by lowering the nose till drooped wing tips are level and trimming for that speed. Use the trim to maintain the speed all the way till roundout so that the flaperons remain loaded, don't hold pressure.  Approach with a closed throttle again so the flaperons remain loaded. 

Do not begin your round out high in order to conserve energy.

Combine your roundout with your flare (no need to bleed of speed with a closed throttle and 30° flaperon) 

Your wingtip is no longer level and and no longer keeping your flaperons loaded so move your stick to the aft stop as soon as you can without ballooning.  This will keep your flaperons loaded and your level of control high.

Advance the throttle a very small amount to soften that final settling for a while.  As your timing improves you won't need this much.

 

 

 

 

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WmInce   
1 hour ago, Ed Cesnalis said:

The difference is a choice of energy source that you use to load your flaperons. 

A CTSW can run out of energy very rapidly and as Roger points out it results in bent gear :( It happens with 30° of flaperons because that is an extremely dirty configuration, with 30° loss of energy can be rapid and problematic. Roger is a bit of a speed guy now and its true that extra energy protects from rapid and problematic energy loss but at a price.

Our options for loading our flaperons are:

  1. Throttle
  2. Pitch attitude

To benefit from your 30° flaperon approach and landing :)  you want to keep your flaperons loaded all the way to contact with the runway.

Conversely, to realize diminished control from  your 30° flaperon use just unload them (its easy to do).  When you unload them you loose the buoyant feeling and wings want to drop or the plane wants to stop flying or drift takes a lot of input to control. :(

To get a bad result just fly the approach similarly to an approach with 15° and there will be points in your approach / landing where the flaps unload.

With practice you can do any kind of approach you want and keep your flaperons loaded but until that becomes 2nd nature here is an approach/landing method that I generally use for consistency and ease. 

The idea is to load the flaps early by lowering the nose till drooped wing tips are level and trimming for that speed. Use the trim to maintain the speed all the way till roundout so that the flaperons remain loaded, don't hold pressure.  Approach with a closed throttle again so the flaperons remain loaded. 

Do not begin your round out high in order to conserve energy.

Combine your roundout with your flare (no need to bleed of speed with a closed throttle and 30° flaperon) 

Your wingtip is no longer level and and no longer keeping your flaperons loaded so move your stick to the aft stop as soon as you can without ballooning.  This will keep your flaperons loaded and your level of control high.

Advance the throttle a very small amount to soften that final settling for a while.  As your timing improves you won't need this much.

Strictly pilot technique.

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