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Buckaroo

Won’t start??

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Thanks Roger I’ll try that! 

Now the other day when it flat wouldn’t start was that flooding? She’s never been stubborn like that day!

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7 hours ago, Roger Lee said:

Buckaroo

Do this a few times and do not deviate from it anlet us know. 

All first star. ts should be full choke and crack the throttle 3/8"provided that your idle rpm is not over 1900 rpm after it is warm. Hold the key until it starts. Don't turn lose just because you think it might start.  The starter will automatically disengage at around 850 rpm. After it is at running temps then no choke just crack the throttle. None of my clients have issues.

I always use full choke for the first start of the day, but I never advance the throttle until the engine has started, and I am shutting off the choke.  

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I have always been kind of anal with things like my wife starting the car and laying on the starter after the engine starts. Now I read you can lay on the key start feature seconds after she starts. Even for many seconds! This is new to me but because of this forum I again have learned a valuable bit of unique information and I thank all of you! 

Many times I have backed off just before the start probably stressing out the clutch! 

Again thanks! 

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I didn't say that you specifically can, in regards to your car and starting. I do not know your car starter design. But if it has a Bendix drive (or one of its derivatives), yes, you very likely could just stay on the starter until after it's on. But there might be something else at play here as well. What does your car's manual say?

There are other starter engagement systems as well out there.

For more food for thought, don't ever crank a starter on a running engine, unless you really know how it's designed. A starter with a Bendix for example, will cause the pinion gear to attempt to reengage, and it will make the most Unholy grinding sound you've ever heard.

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You can turn loose after it starts. Just don't let go until it starts. I see people do this too often. You need to start a diagnostics plan. If you keep bouncing a round with all these things you'll rule out nothing and keep having the problem. You need a plan and stick with it.

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3 hours ago, Tom Baker said:

I always use full choke for the first start of the day, but I never advance the throttle until the engine has started, and I am shutting off the choke.  

My experience also.

For the last 4 years, that technique has never failed to start the engine normally.

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On March 7, 2018 at 7:45 PM, Anticept said:

I didn't say that you specifically can, in regards to your car and starting. I do not know your car starter design. But if it has a Bendix drive (or one of its derivatives), yes, you very likely could just stay on the starter until after it's on. But there might be something else at play here as well. What does your car's manual say?

There are other starter engagement systems as well out there.

For more food for thought, don't ever crank a starter on a running engine, unless you really know how it's designed. A starter with a Bendix for example, will cause the pinion gear to attempt to reengage, and it will make the most Unholy grinding sound you've ever heard.

 

On March 8, 2018 at 5:07 AM, Buckaroo said:

I’ll bet a lot of people learned something new on this starting thread!:clap-3332:

 

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