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DJ Todd B

What's the best way to Jack up the Main Gear - Brakes

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I lift the wing to get the wheel and tire off of the ground and have a friend place a block under the axle.  I made wood blocks that are custom fit to cradle the axles.

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If you are by yourself, you can just use a floor jack and small block of wood just inside the wheel under the axle.

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I made it when I had the small tires. Now with the tundra tires I have added an inch or so to raise it a little higher so the tire clears the ground. Put in the hole in the back of the wheel then go to the wing tip and lift until it swings down. The plane will sit with the tire in the air. If you modify it and angle the legs in toward the center it is then very easy to grab one leg and push the plane to get the tire back on the ground after the repair.

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You can lift up down by the gear leg, but there is an easier and safer way that it won't fall.

I'll take a picture Monday and post. I take my engine hoist and put a small metal bracket on top of the hoist end above the hook. Then I put a 12" sq. piece of plywood and then a 6.00x6 tire with a tube in it inflated to around 3 psi. This now fits nicely under the wing right by the wing tie down where it's the strongest and then jack it up until the tire is off the ground. I use this to also pull the wings. Then I can lift or lower the wings at will to align the pin holes when re-installing the wings.

During the tire change process or brake job most people have to leave the wing jacked in the air and then fuel transfers to the other wing and many times it will over flow. I can lowerthe wings level while I do the work after the tire is off.

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10 hours ago, Roger Lee said:

During the tire change process or brake job most people have to leave the wing jacked in the air and then fuel transfers to the other wing and many times it will over flow. I can lowerthe wings level while I do the work after the tire is off.

Or you can put a line clamp no the fuel line to prevent fue transfer.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/KD-Tools-Automotive-Hose-Pinch-Off-Pliers/50190741?cm_mmc=SCE_PLA_ONLY-_-ToolsAndHardware-_-SosHandTools-_-50190741:KD_Tools&CAWELAID=&kpid=50190741&CAGPSPN=pla&k_clickID=33d172fc-9980-47e6-ab0a-c0213c765aa1&gclid=CjwKCAjw-6bWBRBiEiwA_K1ZDTwcaz_95r8uVOx9_zTtfQe6X2zZ4sCo_8xyASy9BgIw-GPj6HUV7BoCMfoQAvD_BwE

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Inside between the door post and the mushroom for the CTLS. You will see the orange firesleeve. You can clamp right through the firesleeve. If you are low on fuel and fairly quick I wouldn't worry to much about it. If you are full of fuel and or going to leave it jacked up for a while I would clamp it. If you are completely full of fuel you may still have some fuel out of the vent anyway.

It is on the front side of the firewall for the CTSW.

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Thanks everyone for your input on how to best Jack Up the plane for Tire and Brake removal. 

I Had this Hoyer in my hanger that I have used for lifting up other aircraft that I have owned and decided to try it ONE MORE TIME for this task and it worked like a charm.  Since the gear is tapered as it gets closer to the Wheels, this tight "webbing" tightened itself as it was lifted up the Gear,  preventing it from climbing up too far or close to the fuselage. Since the legs SPREAD on this Hoyer, I had plenty of space to work. Oh... and since I only lifted it a few inches, no fuel leaked out the vent , even with about 19 gallons remaining.

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What I've done is a bit more rudimentary: Set a cinder block (or some such similar sized object) behind the main gear stub, lift up on the underside of the wing by hand (preferable along the spar and well outboard), walk back a step such as to pivot the plane around the other main gear (and drag the nose) until the axle gear stub is over the block, then set it down.

Mike Koerner

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I like my lift because then there is nothing in your way while working. I tried other jacks at the axle and leg strut, but these thing were just in my way. Plus it doesn't matter if I get a 6.00x6 or a 4.00x6 tire setup in the shop.

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Mine is similar to Roger's, I just use a six foot step ladder with a bunch of padding (old towels) on top.  I do have a borrowed engine hoist in my hangar (been there for six months) and plenty of old tires, so I will try that method next time.

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The ladder is okay, but with the smaller tires it makes a wing pull re-alignment a little more challenging because it's almost too tall. Using the hoist allows you to align the holes fairly easy when by yourself.

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7 hours ago, Roger Lee said:

The ladder is okay, but with the smaller tires it makes a wing pull re-alignment a little more challenging because it's almost too tall. Using the hoist allows you to align the holes fairly easy when by yourself.

Roger I have great respect for anyone that does a wing pull on their own. Would not you need a lift on each wing to re -align the holes?.

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It would make it easier because wing height on the smaller tires is different on the larger tires. I have the lift on one side, but only a 6' ladder on the other. The ladder is okay for the lerger wheel aircraft, but a little too tall for the smaller wheels.

Yes two lifts would be better.

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Roger, how about a tire & tube on top of the ladder to inflate/deflate to adjust to the height you need?  I have a wood ladder which I made a flat top to put my tire/tube on but haven't used your hoist for the other wing.  Next time I pull my wings, I'm going to get a hoist and use this on one side with my ladder and tire/tube on the other.  Caution:  Protect the wing surface if using a tire.  I have seen where the carbon black in a tire has permanently left a circle on the underside of the wing.  Application of cleaners or solvents has not been able to remove this.

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7 hours ago, Roger Lee said:

It would make it easier because wing height on the smaller tires is different on the larger tires. I have the lift on one side, but only a 6' ladder on the other. The ladder is okay for the lerger wheel aircraft, but a little too tall for the smaller wheels.

Yes two lifts would be better.

I have two ladders I use. One is just the right height. The other was a wooden, and just a bit to tall. I cut a few inches of the legs, and it is just right now. I also have two tall jacks that I thought about configuring to support the wings.

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Hi Dick,

I tried to call the other day. I'm at home all day today so call me.

If the tire is clean then I have never had any black residue on a wing. I used my "Oil Eater" degreaser to clean it.

The tire is so stiff and the wing's weight is so little it doesn't really compress the tire much. Tom's way would work well. Cut a few inches off the bottom for the smaller tire CT's and add a little more cushion on the larger tire CT's.

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