Jump to content
AGLyme

New CT In The Skies Over CT (as in Connecticut)

Recommended Posts

I agree with JLang. I cant find anything wrong with the post so without a written reason,  I just assume wrong click.   However,  I have also learned to ignore thumbs down clicks - there are some very unhappy people out there and I am just happy I am not one of them.     Back to RPM - yeah,  there have been many posts the best WOT should be 5600-5650.   I am currently getting only 100kts IAS with a WOT of 5800.  (sea level avg 32 degree temp, tropics).    I do like my current setting for the takeoff but I lose a bit on the cruise speed.  (probably 3-5kts)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats on getting back into flying. I took a 20+ year layoff from flying after selling my Mooney in 1994. Figured I would never own another airplane till I was visiting a friend who owns an FBO in Idaho. He had a 2007 CTSW that just wasn't as popular in the rental market as he thought so he figured he would sell it. I looked at it, sat in it, fired up the glass panel, went for a ride in it and to my surprise, bought it. Best thing I have ever done. It was my 70th birthday present to myself! Oh what the hell, its the kids money anyway. Enjoy and report back with plenty of pictures. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You get my “upvote” for that story Mike  😀

At my local airport, the school leased a Kappa and it has become a very popular trainer.  I have a few hours in it and liked it.  I would think the CT would be a better trainer due to the superb cockpit width and ease of of entry.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having used a CT as a trainer for several years I have come to the conclusion that it is a great airplane, but not so great as a trainer. That being said if you learn to fly a CT well you will not have many issues transitioning to other aircraft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AG, ignore the "ups and downs".  I really never really knew they were there until you mentioned them.  I'm enjoying reading your comments.  It is reassuring and enjoyable to hear from yet another person who has had no experience flying a CT describe the "ah ha" moments when the unforseen capabilities of the CT are being discovered.  This used to be a best kept secret but less and less now every time a new owner comes on board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom, when I jumped in the Cub to re-start my flying career (after a 37 years sabbatical), I thought on day 1... "this is way too hard".  I persevered and I learned to utilize that thing in the back that one moves with his/her feet, it became clear that I was learning how to really "fly".  Moving into the CT was a natural because of the Cub experience, glad I did it.  In a way, landing the CT is hybrid tricycle/conventional gear from a skill set (hand/eye/feet) perspective.  Once one masters the CT Landing, the balance of the experience is superior in all respects within the 2 place class.  The Pipistrel is a great and similar product, but I found the CT's view, interior comfort and Panel far better for my liking.

Thanks Run, I feel like a baby for complaining, but, someone has to speak out about that.  I do hope the Moderators remove that down vote button not only on this Forum but in all social networking.  It is a nightmare feature for the run of the mill human race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, AGLyme said:

Tom, when I jumped in the Cub to re-start my flying career (after a 37 years sabbatical), I thought on day 1... "this is way too hard".  I persevered and I learned to utilize that thing in the back that one moves with his/her feet, it became clear that I was learning how to really "fly".  Moving into the CT was a natural because of the Cub experience, glad I did it.  In a way, landing the CT is hybrid tricycle/conventional gear from a skill set (hand/eye/feet) perspective.  Once one masters the CT Landing, the balance of the experience is superior in all respects within the 2 place class.  The Pipistrel is a great and similar product, but I found the CT's view, interior comfort and Panel far better for my liking.

Thanks Run, I feel like a baby for complaining, but, someone has to speak out about that.  I do hope the Moderators remove that down vote button not only on this Forum but in all social networking.  It is a nightmare feature for the run of the mill human race.

I think I could teach someone to fly in a Cub in almost half the time it takes in the CT because of the complexity.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually think the CTLSi is the easiest airplane I have ever flown.  Coming from a Cessna 310, it took a few hours to work out the landing, but other than that, all you do is give it the gas and go.  In my opinion, the only thing that requires any effort is keeping the ball centered.  The 310 was an easier plane to land, but I thought it was pretty easy to fly too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update 3:  Breezy...7-9, gusts to 14/15 today...  another trainer (C-172) in the pattern and the occasional guest airplane...a great practice session.   Wind was mostly down the runway, with a slight cross, the sock was active.   We flew at my new home airport (Chester, CT)…  Learned a ton.  We practiced 2 Go-arounds as well… and the plane took off like a rocket, it was chilly out so the air molecules were in the plane's favor.  I have a lot of confidence that Go Arounds are a cinch in this plane and to not pull that handle is dumb if the landing is iffy.  Almost 2 hours of constant T&G's... no solo today, a lot of fun however.  My regular instructor (Cub/Kapp LSA) went up too and he loved the plane, he flew it beautifully.  All good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/7/2018 at 9:38 AM, Tom Baker said:

I think I could teach someone to fly in a Cub in almost half the time it takes in the CT because of the complexity.

Complexity?

Tom, please elaborate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The CT flies very much like a high performance airplane minus the constant speed prop. Things happen to fast for some who is learning to fly. You can bust pattern altitude by 200 feet in what seems like the blink of an eye. The CT has more yaw to control based on power needing more right rudder with power and left rudder when power is reduced. The CT has more adverse yaw issues in landing configuration, especially with the light control forces and shorter stick. The CT has flaps, and the Cub doesn't. The typical CT has more instrumentation to draw the students attention away from actually flying the airplane. In a Cub with an instructor you really can't see much of the instruments it does have. It is much easier to maintain the proper speed with a Cub because of the more narrow operating range range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×