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Ed Cesnalis

Not getting rid of me so easily

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I was very fortunate. One of my worst days somehow turned into one of my best???

The mission to replace my beloved but somewhat beat to death CTSW is going well.  Expecting to be back in the air in 3-4 weeks.

 

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54 minutes ago, Duane Jefts said:

Relieved here in Tucson.  Must have periodic pictures of the mountains.

good to hear Duane,  

With an April break from mountain flying I am turning my attention to editing.  This metamorphic rock that's always shadowed in Convict Canyon is my nemisis.

Convict Canyon-22.jpg

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15 hours ago, Ed Cesnalis said:

I was very fortunate. One of my worst days somehow turned into one of my best???

The mission to replace my beloved but somewhat beat to death CTSW is going well.  Expecting to be back in the air in 3-4 weeks.

 

Does that mean another CT, or something else?

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11 hours ago, Ed Cesnalis said:

it does, another CTSW.  I still prefer low wings and want more speed but the CTSW checks more boxes than anything else.

I bought my 07 CTSW almost 3 years ago not knowing anything about LSA airplanes. Turns out to be the best num nuts purchase I’ve ever made! This forum has made the difference between a bad experience and an awesome one! Thanks everyone! 

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I am quite excited about the 07 SW replacement because it upgrades so many things from my old bird.  I like everything from the graphics on down.  It falls short on Skyview but otherwise quite sweet.

I'm sensitive to the bittersweet occasion for the member selling to me and it doesn't seem the time to be bragging on it.

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1 hour ago, Roger Lee said:

Hi Ed,

What was your flap setting when the wind pushed you over?

-6 with a tailwind and gusts were cross to quartering.

The gust lifted my tail near the end of the taxiway.  I used throttle to regain directional control and was unable to stop.  Attempting to stop / turn at the end caused the nose wheel collapse and nose over.

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Ed, sorry to hear of your mishap!

Most pilots know that a quartering tailwind is challenging, but I have seen little discussion of the proper technique if you have to land in a quartering tail wind.

We don't want the wind to "get under" the tail.  My guess is to use lots of flap and make sure the stick is in your lap on touchdown.  Slower than normal would help with the visual sensation of higher speed.

Does anyone teach students about this?

WF

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I think the reason a “special technique” isn’t taught is that there isn’t one!

 

Other than the faster touchdown speed, nothing changes. And in the absence of shear, no way “the wind” can get “under the tail”, since the plane is being carried with the wind - at least until the plane touches down. Once slowed to taxi speed, appropriate stick forward will help prevent the tail lifting, though that’s mainly an issue with taildraggers. 

 

Dubious about recommending slower airspeed. About the same 1.2 to 1.3. Vso we normally use should still work just fine.

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Ed's incident was a taxi mishap, which is understandable.  But why would you intentionally *land* with any significant quartering tailwind?  Find a runway into the wind!

In a light airplane like the CT, more than a knot or two of tailwind will lead to extreme float and/or very fast touchdown speed.  LSA drivers need to use even more caution than other pilots with regard to downwind landings. 

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It happened a few times to me when landing with shifting direct 90 degrees crosswind - if wind is coming from , say,  18 and then you pick 27  ( 9 or 27 are your choices ) then if it shifts to perhaps 16 at the last moment , you end up with some tailwind and the only way to recognize it is via ground speed and then go around if it is too high ...

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3 hours ago, FlyingMonkey said:

Ed's incident was a taxi mishap, which is understandable.  But why would you intentionally *land* with any significant quartering tailwind?  Find a runway into the wind!

 

Completely understandable. 
 

True confession: About a week ago I took off from my home field with little or no wind and flew around for about 45 minutes. I wondered why I was having to slip so aggressively on final to get down, and why I was eating up so much runway in the flare. Only after landing did I notice the windsock was nearly straight out - the wrong way, of course. So, it happens. 

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8 hours ago, FlyingMonkey said:

Ed's incident was a taxi mishap, which is understandable.  But why would you intentionally *land* with any significant quartering tailwind?  Find a runway into the wind!

In a light airplane like the CT, more than a knot or two of tailwind will lead to extreme float and/or very fast touchdown speed.  LSA drivers need to use even more caution than other pilots with regard to downwind landings. 

answer 1 a one way strip, you have no other choice if you want to land there.

answer 2 slope, landing down hill is not safe.

answer 3 a 10 kt. tailwind is ok as long as you pay very careful attention to speed and use full flap.

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3 minutes ago, ct9000 said:

answer 1 a one way strip, you have no other choice if you want to land there.

answer 2 slope, landing down hill is not safe.

answer 3 a 10 kt. tailwind is ok as long as you pay very careful attention to speed and use full flap.

Answer 4 you have an engine out on departure and turn around to make the opposite runway

 

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1 hour ago, Skunkworks85 said:

Answer 4 you have an engine out on departure and turn around to make the opposite runway

 

This maneuver kills a lot of people!

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16 minutes ago, Buckaroo said:

This maneuver kills a lot of people!

May have SAVED my life once. Climbed out of Felts Field in a Luscombe when the engine quit. Straight ahead was about as horrible as you could imagine. Turned, kept speed up while in the turn and landed halfway down the runway. 500’ was plenty of altitude. I remember the wind was down the runway at least 15 knots. 

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4 minutes ago, KentWien said:

May have SAVED my life once. Climbed out of Felts Field in a Luscombe when the engine quit. Straight ahead was about as horrible as you could imagine. Turned, kept speed up while in the turn and landed halfway down the runway. 500’ was plenty of altitude. 

Great job for you but statistically a pilot that decides to turn back to the field after a power failure odds of a successful landing are very few! We always teach the 45° rule land 45° to the left or to the right never try to turn back to the field you’ve got a tail wind situation against you and stalls and spins etc it’s deadly! 

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