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DJ Todd B

Anyone have info on programming the Flaps

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Does anyone have the information or a link to the info used to program the flaps?  I have called Flight Design twice and have left messages but nobody calls me back. I have already spoke with Roger and would have him do it but he is OUT for the Summer. I also need the switches.  Any help would be appreciated.

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Todd,

Did you ever figure this out? Supposedly there are secret switch settings that allow for -12 flaps and higher cruise found in Euro models.

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From pg 4-55 of the CTLS maintenance manual.

Flap deflection can be adjusted by the flap control panel. Check flap angle of deflection after each adjustment by means of electronic level. 
 
1. Connect printed circuit board (PCB) connectors with corresponding headers of the flap actuator control (Control Card MT-10) wiring harness (Fig. 9).

2. Connect auxiliary control switches SW1 and SW2 to corresponding connectors at the PCB for programming.

3. Set the flap into required position by SW2 using a level. Set the digital screen indication corresponding to the value at the level by SW3.

4. Press SW1 to input data into the PCB memory. If the operation has been performed correctly the display shows the value set by SW3.

5. Move the flap by SW2 to the next required position using a level. Change the value at the screen by SW3 according to the value at the level. Press SW1 to save settings into the memory. 6. Repeat the process for each of the flap positions.

7. If you cannot adjust (set) max angles of deflection (the rod of the flap actuator takes the end position), this problem could be solved by adjusting the length of the rod of flap control. The length of the rod can be adjusted only following the item 4.4.1.5.

8. After rigging all flap positions turn off the circuit breaker 25A.

9. Remove the switches SW1 and SW2.

10. Turn the circuit breaker 25A on.

11. If the instruction has been performed correctly the flaps will take their predefined positions. 

 

I can let you borrow my switch set or if you are ever down to Bisbee you are welcome to use them.

 


 
 

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Point of legality: if you set flaps to go to -12°, the aircraft will no longer make LSA stall speed requirements, and would technically be unairworthy.  It would be a hard issue for anybody else to discover, but it's a thing.

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Does -12° truly increase speed? if so, how much? 

(I'm too lazy to research it myself.)

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41 minutes ago, EB3 said:

Does -12° truly increase speed? if so, how much? 

(I'm too lazy to research it myself.)

Roger Lee dis some testing and was not impressed.  IIRC he said 1-3 knots.

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On 6/29/2019 at 4:05 PM, EB3 said:

I'd be tempted to sell my soul for this info. 

Instead of that, perhaps it is time for you to start looking for a different airplane.

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My last CTSW had neg 12 and my new CTSW is neg six.  New is almost 10kts faster.  Neg 12 does increase stall for sure.

 

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17 minutes ago, WmInce said:

Instead of that, perhaps it is time for you to start looking for a different airplane.

 

I'd forgotten I already sold my soul to buy my CTLS, so I'm set. 

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38 minutes ago, EB3 said:

I'd forgotten I already sold my soul to buy my CTLS, so I'm set. 

Me too!  . . . . :giggle-3307:

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I just finished flying from Phoenix Arizona to Albany New York and tested the flaps at different angles and I confirmed what Roger Lee told me. While it -6 I would cruise at 104 at 5 gallons per minute, I would then switch the flap to full up which one of the few more degrees. The airspeed indicator with then briefly read 105 but within 5 Seconds go back to 104 with a slight but noticeable pitch High attitude which caused it to go back to 104. It seems that anything past -6 will just increase the angle of attack while inducing more drag

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9 hours ago, Ed Cesnalis said:

My last CTSW had neg 12 and my new CTSW is neg six.  New is almost 10kts faster.  Neg 12 does increase stall for sure.

 

Wow Would be nice if it could be known what exactly causes that big a difference.    

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If the prop and the pitch is the same, my guess would be some kind of drag - probably related to some difference in controls surfaces setup particular to that plane.

This is actually quite interesting - with for instance Flying Monkey reporting his CTSW easily indicating 120-130 knots while Todd reporting indicated at 105 - I know there are external factors like weather related  differences that don’t make these unrelated reports directly comparable but I am tempted to think that this is more than just drag or minor configuration differences ... perhaps different instrument calibration causing some planes to appear slower or faster ...

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8 hours ago, cdarza said:

Wow Would be nice if it could be known what exactly causes that big a difference.    

I don't know what the crossover point is, but there will come a point where reflex flaps will increase drag rather than reduce it.  It might be that -12 is just over the line and -6 is actually more efficient.

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On 7/3/2019 at 6:15 AM, Warmi said:

 perhaps different instrument calibration causing some planes to appear slower or faster ...

This is definitely a factor. 

My 2007 CTSW (-12 flaps) will show 120 knots at 4800rpm, yet even with a slight tailwind I won't be covering the ground at this speed. 

I think my ASI is at least 10% over-reading, at least at high speed. 

I'd like to fix it. 

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Silly question: the GPS ground speed indicated is correct but does the dynon display the calibrated speed based on altitude data or GPS signal?  I know the IAS is from the pitot. 

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Calibrated speed is just your indicated speed corrected for whatever instrument/position error is applicable to your particular plane.

I suspect  you mean TAS  ( true air speed ) in which case a typical EFIS ( Dynon etc ) just needs an outside air temperature sensor in addition to pitot and static to be able to calculate it .

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