Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Duane

anyone in Eastern Washington with a Flight Design?

Recommended Posts

Hi, is there anyone in Eastern Washington who has a Flight Design?  I have a friend who is an experienced pilot, and has purchased a CT2K but needs a little help getting the landings down.  Thanks in advance. Duane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Duane said:

Hi, is there anyone in Eastern Washington who has a Flight Design?  I have a friend who is an experienced pilot, and has purchased a CT2K but needs a little help getting the landings down.  Thanks in advance. Duane

Hey, I used to fly out of Pullman. 

Best advice, don’t be too fast. Approach at 50-55 with flaps 30. Some like 15 flaps. 

To slow down, plan to pull the power to idle at mid-field instead of abeam the numbers. 

Save flaps 40 for when you’re really comfortable to the point of getting bored. It’s not too bad, but good to get used to 30 before messing with 40. 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, KentWien said:

Hey, I used to fly out of Pullman. 

Best advice, don’t be too fast. Approach at 50-55 with flaps 30. Some like 15 flaps. 

To slow down, plan to pull the power to idle at mid-field instead of abeam the numbers. 

Save flaps 40 for when you’re really comfortable to the point of getting bored. It’s not too bad, but good to get used to 30 before messing with 40. 

Good luck!

Hi Kent, thank you for your response.   You are talking about 50-55 nautical miles, correct?   My friend has well over 2 years worth of hours logged.  But like what I have read, so many veteran pilots struggle to transition light sports.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Duane,

Yeah, I should have been more accurate. 50-55 knots.

In the round out, if the runway is long, adding a small amount of power until touchdown makes the flare timing a bit easier. Eventually you’ll have the timing down to do all landings at idle.

Also, the nose throws people off. Best advice (as mentioned elsewhere in the forum, is to put the airplane on a taxi line with the tail and nosewheel directly in the line and then sit in it and note where the nose is when the airplane is straight. Sitting in the left seat requires the nose to be yawed more to the right than you would think. 

Kent 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are not many CT2K here in the states. My guess that the numbers Kent offered are good, but it would be nice to get input from someone with a CT2K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tom Baker said:

There are not many CT2K here in the states. My guess that the numbers Kent offered are good, but it would be nice to get input from someone with a CT2K.

Very good point. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duane,

As Tom and Ed recently pointed out, every CT has its own unique flying characteristics. Maybe every aircraft does?

I have 1400 hours in a CT2k. I have written about its landing characteristics previously. If you are interested, you may be able to find those comments with the search function at the top of the page.

From what I've read on this forum, I think my plane's characteristics are very different than other CTs (CTSW and CTLS). For example, I can't hold the nose off on landing. That situation is aggravated by increased flaps. I would stick with 15-, or even zero-degree flaps, until you're comfortable with plopping down (3-point style) from a few inches off the runway. Bigger main wheels helped. There are other potential remedies which I think I wrote about, but have not yet pursued.

Also, I wouldn't suggest adding power before touchdown. When I've tried this, with the longer wing in ground effect, it's floated down the runway for thousands of feet! In fact, I've had to go around, which is really weird considering how short these aircraft normally land.

I have my idle set toward at the low end of the specified range to make the final approach a little more comfortable. It keeps me out of the trees and off the ALS poles without the need for forward slips (which my most important passenger tends to complain about).

Honestly, I don't consider these characteristics to be a problem. I'm very happy with the plane. I wish it landed like a 172... but otherwise, I like it a lot more. It performs my mission superbly.

Again, this is just me and my plane. Your mileage may vary.

Mike Koerner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...