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Warmi

CTLS crash

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Yesterday there was a fatal CTLS crash at my airport.

An older gentleman just took off at around 10 AM and crashed within few hundred feet from the airport ..  he had his hangar very close to mine and we have talked a few times about our Rotax powered planes.

I was at the airport at that time with my wife but since we were syncing carbs I don't even remember seeing or hearing anyone take off and haven't learned about the accident until this morning.
There is nothing but fields around C56 and his plane was found right in the middle of one.

https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/236831

 

CTSL_crash.jpg

 

Here is the crash site in relation to the airport:

image.png.be14dd0b9bf45678b2261475b2997820.png

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Extremely hard / nose down impact.  With so many landing options (recently planted low crop fields), in midwest flat land country, what a heartbreaking and terrible outcome.  Not much for winds & weather factor, yesterday was a beauty of a day here in neighboring MI, I flew a couple hops.  Will be interesting to see the final report and if any flight data can be extracted from ADS-B track, electronics, etc.  A reminder to have a plan for various scenarios, rehearse in your mind, for when things go wrong low to ground there is little time to decide & commit.  And above all else - fly the airplane.

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Sorry to hear about that but 84 years old anything could have happened. I am pretty sure

I will not be flying at 84 . Will not be driving a car either. My brain has already slowed

down only 65 now.

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This is awful for family and friends of this pilot, and is a reminder to us of the potential consequences of our mistakes. Apparently, it started with engine trouble, and ended with LOC over flat terrain. I recently experienced a “high rpm” alarm buzzer and flashing red light just after takeoff, and even while knowing it was false (oil temp reading 1 deg, you can probably guess the cause),  it was enough of a distraction to make me botch the landing.  We’ve all heard the Bob Hoover quote about flying the airplane all the way through the crash, and I tell myself I can do that. But the truth is, it requires some serious mental discipline in that moment. You can’t overestimate the potential for distraction to diminish your performance.  

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Great points John.  
I replaced a defective Dynon recently.  To Dynon’s credit they replaced it for $0.  For a year now I too would get crazy error messages... the worst was “low fuel” over One of the Great Lakes after coming home from OSH... the alarm went away after a minute or so.  Seemed like an hour.

As you mentioned, keep flying.  Always keep flying.  In reflection that is what I did.  Fortunately I didn’t panic, nor did I panic on the other dozen or so error messages, most of them on the ground.  

but I was nervous and for several seconds I was totally confused and I desperately wanted confirmation if I was out of fuel or not.  I looked at the wing tubes first... no bubbles because the tanks were full.  The Dynon fuel gauge revealed almost full.

I was 7,500 feet up.  I cannot imagine that same situation, an alarm and a real engine problem — only a few hundred feet up.    A harsh reminder to practice engine outs and departure stalls - a Lot.  I know I have focused  my training as of late on landing short field.  Will add to the program starting immediately.  
Rest In Peace fellow Pilot.

 

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I actually went flying that evening and had my usual video going for capturing my landings which also captured the crash site.

Doesn't look like this was a low level engine out with another impossible turn type of crash to me, when I passed the crash site turning crosswind  I was at around 600 AGL ...  so I am not sure what really happened .. 

 

 

 

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23 hours ago, Warmi said:

I actually went flying that evening and had my usual video going for capturing my landings which also captured the crash site.

Doesn't look like this was a low level engine out with another impossible turn type of crash to me, when I passed the crash site turning crosswind  I was at around 600 AGL ...  so I am not sure what really happened .. 

 

 

Just out of curiosity, This is some sort of ground wire?

image.png.25bfbc80e61a8b0077f52921d03657ee.png

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18 minutes ago, Skunkworks85 said:

Just out of curiosity, This is some sort of ground wire?

image.png.25bfbc80e61a8b0077f52921d03657ee.png

Yeah, it is a carbon fiber plane so it tends to build up static electricity -  according to the manual, the idea is that as soon as the plane lands the wire will touch the ground and discharge it.

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Just now, Warmi said:

Yeah, it is a carbon fiber plane so it tends to build up static electricity -  according to the manual, the idea is that as soon as the plane lands the wire will touch the ground and discharge it.

Never heard of this.

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7 hours ago, GrassStripFlyBoy said:

If you mount them on the outside of pant, and bend to 45 degrees, they double as a curb feeler.  I hear those were a thing back in the 70's?

50's & 60"s. Not so much in the 70"s.

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No. The curb feelers were mounted directly to the belly of retractables. If you hear it rub you know you forgot to put the gear down. It gives you a chance to pull up and extend the gear before landing.

Mike Koerner   

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18 hours ago, Mike Koerner said:

No. The curb feelers were mounted directly to the belly of retractables. If you hear it rub you know you forgot to put the gear down. It gives you a chance to pull up and extend the gear before landing.

Mike Koerner   

So, do you hear the rub before or after the prop starts taking chunks out of the asphalt?:giggle-3307:

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It looks like this crashed CTLS had Rotax 912 ULS engine with aftermarket fuel injection kit and a turbocharger installed- not sure if it is related but on this flight he was also heading to Kankakee about 20 minutes away - that’s where he was servicing his plane at https://www.theultralightplace.com

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On 10/24/2020 at 7:49 AM, Warmi said:

It looks like this crashed CTLS had Rotax 912 ULS engine with aftermarket fuel injection kit and a turbocharger installed- not sure if it is related but on this flight he was also heading to Kankakee about 20 minutes away - that’s where he was servicing his plane at https://www.theultralightplace.com

Stopped at Kanakee on my way to Oshkosh a few years back.  Nice little airport.

Sad story, sorry for the pilot and family.

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Warmi, Tom,

I'm sorry about the loss of your friend.

I'm also very sorry to realize just now that my previous post to this subject was so totally inappropriate. By reading only "unread content" several days after having read the original post, I had lost the context of the thread.

Sorry,

Mike Koerner

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