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Pulling wings


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They just slide out. I secure them with a couple strips of duct tape across the gap on top. This prevents them from flopping down and possibly gouging the fuselage. I also use one strip in the ailerons. Them flopping down is not an issue, but it makes reconnecting the controls easier when it goes back together. 

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A single person wing pull really isn't that hard. LOL

Just use a support for each wing. To help align the spar holes to insert the pins I use an engine lift under one wing you the spar can be moved up or down to align the holes. I have a 6' ladder with a pad between the ladder top and wing so not to cause any marks.

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  • 2 weeks later...
9 hours ago, MileHighCTLS said:

You would think that since wing pulling is a regular/periodic maintenance requirement on the CTLS, that there would be a detailed set of instructions, with diagrams, or even videos to reference!

 

Unless the airplane is a ELSA the training comes from meeting the requirements of CFR 65.107, (d) for a light sport repairman. If you are a A&P mechanic you may perform the work, but you may not supervise or approve for return to service unless you have performed the work at an earlier date. To be able to approve the work you will have to show your ability to perform the task to the administrator, or perform it under the supervision of an A&P who has performed the work before.

As a mechanic I have called people with more knowledge than me to ask questions about a specific task before, but I do find some of the questions asked about maintenance on the forum concerning. I know many people are quite capable, but the lack of knowledge can cause issues. Over the years I have fixed several thousand dollars of work on CT's that was performed by people who were rated mechanics or repairmen that didn't know what they were doing. Some of these were safety of flight issues. And this is just with the few airplanes that I have seen. 

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"As a mechanic I have called people with more knowledge than me to ask questions about a specific task before, but I do find some of the questions asked about maintenance on the forum concerning. I know many people are quite capable, but the lack of knowledge can cause issues. Over the years I have fixed several thousand dollars of work on CT's that was performed by people who were rated mechanics or repairmen that didn't know what they were doing. Some of these were safety of flight issues. And this is just with the few airplanes that I have seen. "

 

I fully agree with Tom. Phone calls are cheap and easy plus they hopefully reduce repair cost from things done wrong. Like Tom I have seen many LSA come from a mechanic that just didn't learn about a procedure first.

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Both the sight tubes and the rubber fuel line is fairly easy. I do drill a hole to get to the rubber fuel line just past the sight tube opening and replace any clamp with a fuel injection clamp and use an Allen head screw in it. That makes tightening or future replace very easy.

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1 hour ago, Roger Lee said:

Both the sight tubes and the rubber fuel line is fairly easy. I do drill a hole to get to the rubber fuel line just past the sight tube opening and replace any clamp with a fuel injection clamp and use an Allen head screw in it. That makes tightening or future replace very easy.

 

Hole in wing root rib (FD Manufacturer Approval #090210 for CT2kCTSW)(1).pdf

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Bill Ince posted the LOA for the hole.

When you slide the wing out just drill a 3/4" hole through the fuselage right on top of that inner rubber hose clamp. Then it's easy to remove the rubber hose clamp. Then I replace that with a fuel injection clamp using an Allen head screw. Then from now on all I have to do is use my 6" Tee handle Allen wrench that will not slip out of the hole in the head like a flat tip screwdriver and you don't have to fight to use a socket. This makes it a piece of cake to tighten or remove in the future. Then I place a piece of the white Bolus tape over the hole.

If you don't put a hole there how do you get to the hose clamp inside the "A" post area to remove or install one. The hole makes life easy and you never have to pry or possibly damage the metal tube it slides over.

I place my finger inside the fuel sight tube to guide the first drill hole with a small drill bit to make sure I'm right over the clamp area. If the small hole is dead on a follow up with the 3/4" bit

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When I removed the old Oetiker clamps I simply opened up the crimped ear and slid the hose off, easy peasy. I also use an injection clamp to replace the original Oetiker. I use a hex head screw so a 7mm socket can fit over it. The screws from the old oil line clamps work well. I access from the same direction that you install the hose. No big deal. To tighten the clamp I use a 1/4" rotator ratchet, but a high tooth count ratchet should work. I have changed hoses on one that had the holes drilled, and personally it is not worth the extra trouble drilling the holes in my opinion.

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59 minutes ago, Roger Lee said:

Tom, the hole only takes 15 - 30 seconds to drill and allows much easier access to remove the old clamps and far easier when it needs to be done later.

Roger, again having removed the old hoses and clamp, and changing hoses on airplanes both with and without the holes it is not worth my time to bother getting the drill and bits out to drill the holes. I can have the old Oetiker clamps off and the hose removed in less time than it would take me to get the drill and bits out. You have to remember that I have been working on these airplane just about as long as you have. I was one of the first to do a hose changes on a CTSW, CTLS, and CTLSi. It is not my first rodeo. 

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  • 2 months later...

New CTLS to the fleet.  Yikes.  On delivery, the fuel level in the sight tubes is not perceivable. Wonder how many years this "safety of flight" issue was passed over.  

Recommendation: even if your A&P or LSRM is lazy, have them replace the sight tubes when you can no longer see the fuel level in them.  You might need to see the level some day.

sight tube 1.HEIC Sight tube 2.HEIC

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My .02 cents............

I see this on CT's I haven't personally seen and customers always complain they can't see the fuel level in the site types that have used the yellow Tygon tubing.. FD a long time ago used clear tubing, but along the way they switched to that yellow Tygon tubing. When I did a research project back in 2008 I called 4 of the leading tubing MFG's. The issue is the brown staining from auto fuel. I ask all of them about this. They all told me all their tubing's will stain over time (including the yellow Tygon folks) and get cloudy because they are porous. Not to the point of leaking just on the surface that allows the staining to happen. So the yellow Tygon tubing already has reduced visibility and now add the brown staining from auto fuel and it is far worse and happens quicker than just plain clear poly tubing. The clear tubing FD used in the early days and that many of us use today usually last easily between wing inspections. I had a few people used to say it get hard and will break. So I made a video of clear poly tubing that was 3 years old from a wing inspection that used clear poly tubing. The poly tubing just like the Tygon tubing gets more rigid over time, but neither one will break. I have a video of me bending that old 3 year tubing completely over backward 180 degrees. It's stiffer than when new, but WILL NOT BREAK.

Here is a video of a three year old poly tube. It is clearer than the yellow Tygon tube and still flexes.

"Tygon is a brand name for a family of flexible polymer tubing consisting of a variety of materials to be used "across a range of specialized fluid transfer requirements".[1] The specific composition of each type is a trade secret. Some variants have multiple layers of different materials. Tygon is a registered trademark of Saint-Gobain Corporation. It is an invented word, owned and used by Saint-Gobain and originated in the late 1930s. Tygon products are produced in three countries, but sold throughout the world. Tygon tubing is used in many markets, including food and beverage, chemical processing, industrial, laboratory, medical, pharmaceutical, and semiconductor processing. There are many formulations of clear, flexible, Tygon tubing. The chemical resistance and physical properties vary among the different formulations, but the tubing generally is intended to be "so resistant to chemical attack that it will handle practically any chemical", whether liquid, gas, or slurry.[2] While largely non-reactive, Tygon has been reported to liberate carbon monoxide and is listed among carbon monoxide-releasing molecules"

 

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To the best of my knowledge Flight Design has never sold the yellow Tygon tubing. Lockwood used to use it, Airtime uses it, but I have never received any from Flight Design. The only time I have used the yellow Tygon is when Flight Design was out and I ordered some from Lockwood, and that has been years ago.

I have encountered some that was hard, brittle, and it had shrunk. It broke removing it from the nipples.

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I have always used the clear polyurethane tubing and never had an issue. I keep seeing yellow tubing coming into the shop from all areas. Some are sure using it. I had one just two weeks ago and it was so dark you couldn't see anything.

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